Worldbulletin News

Worldbulletin News Worldbulletin News Portal


21:33, 28 May 2017 Sunday
Update: 13:39, 15 May 2012 Tuesday

  • Share
EU attacks "pirate targets" on Somali coast
EU attacks
(File Photo)

The European Union's anti-piracy force attacked Somali pirate installations on Somalia's coastline by air on Tuesday for the first time since its mandate was expanded earlier this year.

World Bulletin / News Desk

The European Union's anti-piracy force attacked Somali pirate installations on Somalia's coastline by air on Tuesday for the first time since its mandate was expanded earlier this year.

The strike on what the EU force said was "on known pirate supplies" came four days after Somali pirates hijacked a Greek-owned oil tanker carrying close to a million barrels of crude oil in the Arabian Sea.

"We believe this action by the EU Naval Force will further increase the pressure on, and disrupt pirates' efforts to get out to sea to attack merchant shipping and dhows," Operation Commander of the EU Naval Force, Rear Admiral Duncan Potts, said in a statement.

"The focused, precise and proportionate action was conducted from the air and all forces returned safely to EU warships on completion," the statement said, adding that initial surveillance had indicated that no Somalis had been wounded as a result of the attack.

The EU extended its counter-piracy operation off the coast of Somalia by two years in March, until December 2014, and expanded the area it covers to include the coastline itself.

Until Tuesday's attack, it had only operated in Somalia's territorial and internal waters. But its decision to extend its area of operations to include Somali coastal territory - land along the country's coastline - meant it was able to target pirates' weaponry and other equipment on land.



Legal Notice: Copyright, trade marks and other intellectual property rights in this website can not be reproduced without the prior permission.

  • Share

Libya extremist group Ansar al-Sharia announces dissolution
Libya extremist group Ansar al-Sharia announces dissolution

The Libyan jihadist group Ansar al-Sharia, which is linked to Al-Qaeda and deemed a terrorist organisation by the UN and United States, announced its "dissolution" in a communique published online on Saturday. Washington accuses the group of being behind the September 11, 2012 attack on the US consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi in which ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed. Ansar al-Sharia is one of the jihadist groups that sprung up in Benghazi, Libya's second largest city, in the chaos following the death of dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011. They overran the city in 2014. East Libyan military strongman Khalifa Haftar earlier this month launched an offensive to oust jihadist fighters from their two remaining strongholds in Benghazi. In its communique Ansar al-Sharia said it had been "weakened" by the fighting. The group lost its leader, Mohammed Azahawi, in clashes with Haftar's forces in Benghazi at the end of 2014. Most of its members then defected to the so-called Islamic State group. Ansar al-Sharia later joined the Revolutionary Shura Council of Benghazi, a local alliance of Islamist militias. At its zenith, Ansar al-Sharia was present in Benghazi and Derna in eastern Syria, with offshoots in Sirte and Sabratha, western Libya. The organisation took over barracks and other sites abandoned by the ousted Kadhafi forces and transformed them into training grounds for hundreds of jihadists seeking to head to Iraq or Syria.