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03:18, 24 June 2017 Saturday
Update: 17:13, 18 June 2017 Sunday

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Huge forest fires kill 62 in Portugal
Huge forest fires kill 62 in Portugal

"Unfortunately this seems to be the greatest tragedy we have seen in recent years in terms of forest fires," a visibly moved Prime Minister Antonio Costa said.

World Bulletin / News Desk

Raging forest fires in Portugal have killed at least 62 people, most of whom burnt to death in their cars, the government said Sunday, in one of the worst such disasters in recent history.

The fire broke out on Saturday in the municipality of Pedrogao Grande in central Portugal, before spreading fast across several fronts.

On Sunday afternoon, nearly 900 firefighters and 300 vehicles were still battling the blaze as scenes of devastation could be seen around the town.

"Unfortunately, this seems to be the greatest tragedy we have seen in recent years in terms of forest fires," said a visibly moved Prime Minister Antonio Costa, who declared three days of mourning starting on Sunday.

The flowing expanse of hills situated between Pedrogao Grande, Figueiro do Vinhos to the west and Castanheira de Pera to the north, which 24 hours before had glowed bright green with eucalyptus plants and pine trees, were completely gutted by the flames.

A thick layer of white smoke hovered over either side of a national motorway for a distance of about 20 kilometres (12 miles), as blackened trees leaned listlessly over charred soil.

A burnt-out car sat outside partly destroyed and abandoned houses, while a few metres away police in face masks surrounded the corpse of a man hidden under a white sheet.

Secretary of State for the Interior Jorge Gomes said 62 people burned to death, mostly trapped in their cars engulfed by flames in the Leiria region.

"It is difficult to say if they were fleeing the flames or were taken by surprise," he said.

More than 50 people were injured, five critically, including one child and four firefighters.

"The number of fatalities could still rise," Costa said. "The priority now is to save those people who could still be in danger."



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