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13:41, 20 October 2017 Friday
Update: 11:40, 02 February 2014 Sunday

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Outside Morsi trial venue, child sisters wear army boots as hats
Outside Morsi trial venue, child sisters wear army boots as hats

Accompanied by their father, the two girls wore army combat boots on their little heads – a sign of their affection for Egypt's armed forces – while cheering for the military chief.

World Bulletin / News Desk
 
Several supporters of Egyptian Defense Minister Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi gathered outside the Cairo Police Academy last week. 

Some carried posters of the top general, while others chanted pro-Sisi slogans. But it was Shahd and Habiba, two young sisters, who raised eyebrows.

Accompanied by their father, the two girls wore army combat boots on their little heads – a sign of their affection for Egypt's armed forces – while cheering for the military chief.

"We're wearing these combat boots like hats because we love Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi," Shahd and Habiba, both under ten years old, told Anadolu Agency, in reference to the army strongman who is widely perceived as the architect of Morsi's ouster – and subsequent imprisonment – last July.

"We love him because he's fighting the Muslim Brotherhood to protect us," Habiba added.

Al-Sisi, appointed Defense Minister by Morsi in 2012, rose to prominence after announcing Morsi's ouster last summer following demonstrations against the latter's presidency.

He is widely expected to announce his candidacy for president imminently, following a Monday statement by Egypt's Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) mandating him to run for the country's top office in response to "popular demands."

"I'd be honored to put the boots on their heads, but they did it themselves," the girls' father said. 

"They always want to wear them without my prompting," he added, as the two girls shook hands with security personnel deployed near the court venue.

A photo of Shahd and Habiba wearing the boots on their heads was widely circulated on social-media outlets, drawing criticism from some observers who voiced disapproval of involving children in Egypt's ongoing political dispute.



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