Egypt politician calls for meeting on reconciliation

Al-Omda said he had waited for the Prime Minister to push for reconciliation with the Brotherhood, noting that Egypt could not move forward without this reconciliation

Egypt politician calls for meeting on reconciliation

World Bulletin/News Desk

An opposition politician has invited the Egyptian government to hold an "emergency" meeting to discuss reconciliation with the Muslim Brotherhood, the movement from which ousted president Mohamed Morsi hails.

"I feel sorry that the Prime Minister insists to call the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist movement, even as other organizations claim responsibility for all terrorist acts committed in this country," ex-lawmaker Mohamed al-Omda, a Morsi backer who has recently been released from jail, said in a statement on Saturday.

Al-Omda made his political debut in 2005 by co-founding the leftist Constitutional Social Liberal Party. He later, however, expressed backing for reformist liberal politician Mohamed ElBaradie who at this point had just retired as World Atomic Energy Agency chief and returned to Egypt to call on then president Hosni Mubarak to initiate political reforms.

After the January 25, 2011 revolution that ousted Mubarak, al-Omda turned into a vocal supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood and its president Mohamed Morsi, who stayed only for one year in office. He was recently put in jail on charges of inciting violence.

Soon after his release, al-Omda suggested reconciliation between the government and the Muslim Brotherhood. His blueprint in this regard calls for lifting a government ban on the activities of Islamist movements like the Brotherhood and putting Egypt back on the "democratic track."

His Saturday remarks come a short time after Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab ruled out the possibility of reconciliation with the Brotherhood and describing it as a "terrorist" organization.

He said he had waited for the Prime Minister to push for reconciliation with the Brotherhood, noting that Egypt could not move forward without this reconciliation.

"A modern state is about consensus, not division," al-Omda said in his statement.

Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, was removed by the military last summer following three days of protests against his single year in power.

Last December, the army-backed government designated the Brotherhood a "terrorist organization," blaming it for a string of deadly attacks on security forces – allegations the group categorically denies.

 

Last Mod: 06 Eylül 2014, 23:42
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