Lesotho leaders given 'few' days to decide on parliament opening

Entirely surrounded by South African territory, the mountainous Kingdom of Lesotho has been dogged by political tension since Prime Minister Thomas Motsoahae Thabane suspended the parliament earlier this year in a bid to circumvent a no-confidence vote.

Lesotho leaders given 'few' days to decide on parliament opening

World Bulletin / News Desk

Jacob Zuma, South African president and current chair of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC), has given Lesotho's leaders a few days to agree on a date on resuming the work of the country's parliament.

"They committed to proceeding with the agreement to open parliament and having a final decision on a date by the time President Zuma consults back with them," Lesotho's Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohlabi Kenneth Tsekoa told Anadolu Agency on Wednesday.

Zuma arrived in the capital Maseru on Tuesday and held talks with Lesotho King Letsie III and leaders of the coalition government on ways of solving the political crisis in the country.

"He told our leaders that they should leave the nation out of the current situation and address challenges pertaining to the development of Lesotho and Basotho so that the country goes back to what it was," Tsekoa said.

While the media in both Lesotho and South Africa reported that Zuma has given Lesotho's leaders two days to settle on a date to reopen the parliament, Samonyane Ntsekele, an adviser to the Prime Minister, told AA that the country's leaders were given some time to decide on a date.

"The involved parties were given a 'few' days in which they would resolve all issues and then consult with President Zuma once this is done," he said.

Entirely surrounded by South African territory, the mountainous Kingdom of Lesotho has been dogged by political tension since Prime Minister Thomas Motsoahae Thabane suspended the parliament earlier this year in a bid to circumvent a no-confidence vote.

Thabane returned to the country earlier this month after fleeing to South Africa with his family, where he had accused the Lesotho army of attempting a military coup against his government.

The Lesotho military reportedly raided police stations, disarmed police units and took several radio stations off air.

Last Mod: 11 Eylül 2014, 10:09
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