Nigerian cybercrime bill allowing wire tapping without court leave

Nigerian president has sent a bill to parliament allowing security agencies to seize record of such conversations from service providers with or without a court leave.

Nigerian cybercrime bill allowing wire tapping without court leave
World Bulletin / News Desk

Nigerian President Goodluck Johnathan has sent a bill to parliament empowering security agencies to intercept, record and listen to communications they believe are suspicious and injurious to national security.
 
The bill, titled Cyber Crime Bill of 2013, allows security agencies to seize record of such conversations from service providers with or without a court leave, especially if they are required for criminal investigation.

The bill, a copy of which was seen by Anadolu Agency on Wednesday, covers all electronic communications such as individual or corporate emails, short messaging service, fax, telephone conversations, voice mails, instant messages, blackberry messenger and others.

Under the bill, a service provider could be directed to spy on individuals and turn in whatever data generated to the government.

Security agencies may order internet service providers or telecom companies to "preserve, hold or retain any traffic data, subscriber information or related content," according to section 21 of the bill.

A defaulting service provider, the bill recommends, is liable to N10 million fine, and its directors, managers or officers are each liable for three years jail term, N7 million fine or both.

The bill also criminalizes and prescribes varying jail terms or fines for transmitting false electronic messages, child pornography, paedophilia and cyber-terrorism.

It prescribes death sentence for anybody who commits crime against Critical National Information Infrastructure, defined as "certain computer systems, networks and information infrastructure vital to the national security of Nigeria or the economy and social well-being of its citizens."

The bill comes almost a year after the Nigerian government allegedly signed a $40m contract with an Israeli security firm, Elbit System, to provide equipment capable of monitoring internet communications of its system.

Nigeria denied signing any such contract at the time but local media countered with proofs of such contract.

It is doubtful this bill would survive opposition in the parliament given possible suspicions it could be used to glean high-value information from the opposition's camp as Nigeria heads to an all-important general election in February of 2015.
Last Mod: 29 Ocak 2014, 13:07
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