Northern governor accuses Nigeria president of 'genocide'

Murtala Nyako, the governor of Adamawa State, claimed that most of the violence in the northeast region is being committed by "militias" and soldiers engaged by the central government, not by Boko Haram militants.

Northern governor accuses Nigeria president of 'genocide'

World Bulletin / News Desk

A Nigerian governor on Saturday accused President Goodluck Jonathan of committing "genocide" in the Muslims-majority northern region.

In a memo addressed to fellow northern governors, Murtala Nyako, the governor of Adamawa State, claimed that most of the violence in the northeast region is being committed by "militias" and soldiers engaged by the central government, not by Boko Haram militants.

In the letter tagged "On the full-fledged genocide in northern Nigeria", Nyako claimed that "cases of mass murders by its (government) bloody killers and cut-throats are well known, but it attributes the killings to so-called Boko Haram."

"The ICC Charter broadly defines genocide as mass killings of human beings; a deliberate action by a government that embarks on a policy that denies a group basic amenities; a deliberate action by a government or group of people who embark on campaign of hatred against the innocent," Nyako wrote in the letter.

"One must confess that all these elements of genocide have been perpetrated by the present federal administration against the people of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe States and is beginning to rapidly spread to other fourteen states of northern Nigeria," he said.

The Nigerian governor alleged that dead bodies being dragged the army armories "speak volumes on genocide being committed in our country today".

"Mass killings of students and children in their schools' dormitories and on their way to take exams are no virtually daily occurrence in Borno and Yobe states," he said.

Pinning down the genocide charges of the Nigerian President, Nyako likened his action in the northern region to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

"The issue now is not between North and South or northern Nigeria versus eastern Nigeria or western Nigeria. We must save our communities, state and Nigeria from Hitler-like evil-minded of a few," Nyako said. "Let me remind ourselves that when Hitler walked out of the 1938 Olympics because a Blackman was winning all his events, humanity pretended it did not notice the beginning of genocide."

In a veiled warning about another civil war in the country, the governor said that "One is quite sure that if you had condemned the coldblooded murder of political and military leaders of northern and western Nigeria origins in the night of 15 January, 1966 by your sons, it would not have led to the subsequent massacre of the innocent and the Nigerian civil war."

The Nigerian Presidency has not commented on the governor's allegations. Jonathan's Easter message to the Christians was also silent about it.

Attempts by AA correspondent to reach the presidential spokesman for comment were futile.

Many, however, believe that Kyako's accusations appear to be a rehash of a letter by former president Olusegun Obasanjo last year, who criticized Jonathan's handling of the Boko Haram crisis, pointing the finger at the Nigerian leader for the insecurity plaguing the country.

The Nigerian Presidency had denied the charges at the time.

Nyako also referenced a court affidavit by convicted Niger Delta militant Henry Okah, who claimed that the presidency was behind a deadly bombing on October 1, 2010 in Abuja.

Okah, who hails from the Delta as Jonathan, was leader of the Movement for the Emancipation of Niger Delta (MEND), the group that claimed responsibility for the October 1 bombing. Shortly following the bombing, Jonathan had publicly absolved MEND of involvement in the attack – a position that earned him public criticism.

Last Mod: 19 Nisan 2014, 17:16
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