Nour Party rejects move against religious parties

Egypt's second biggest Islamist party rejected proposed changes to the constitution that would outlaw parties founded on religious grounds

Nour Party rejects move against religious parties

World Bulletin/News Desk

Egypt's second biggest Islamist party, Nour, on Friday rejected proposed changes to the constitution that would outlaw parties founded on religious grounds, and called the move a "sword drawn" against Islamists.

The proposal, made during meetings of the constitutional committee this week but not yet formally approved, came days after a Cairo court separately banned the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's dominant Islamist force.

"It's wrong to blame the whole Islamist current for the mistakes of the Muslim Brotherhood," said Nour Party head Younes Makhyoun in a statement. "We reject this article completely because it is discriminatory and exclusionary.

"By what right does this article aim a drawn sword at some parties? Are we going to put an article in the constitution that bans founding parties on liberal, secular, socialist or Nasserist grounds?"

Islamist political parties formed after the downfall of veteran autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011 dominated elections, and the Brotherhood's Mohamed Mursi became Egypt's first freely elected president.

But after a year in power, the army ousted him. Security forces have launched a crackdown on the Brotherhood in which hundreds of Islamists were shot dead on the streets of Cairo and thousands more, including Mursi, arrested.

Any move to ban religious parties would redraw Egypt's political map and turn the clock back to the days under Mubarak when Islamists were not allowed to form political parties.

Nour, founded shortly after the popular uprising against Mubarak, backed Mursi's overthrow in July by signing up to a road map for Egypt's political transition that included amending the constitution and setting a time frame for new elections.

But earlier this month, Nour, whose representative is one of only two Islamists on the 50-member constitutional committee, walked out of a meeting to protest against moves to curb the influence of Islam in state affairs.

 

Last Mod: 28 Eylül 2013, 11:06
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