Pro-Morsi bloc aims to broaden 'revolutionary' front

The alliance stressed its appreciation for the Wasat Party's efforts in recent months to counter last year's "military coup" that unseated Morsi

Pro-Morsi bloc aims to broaden 'revolutionary' front

World Bulletin/News Desk

The National Alliance for the Defense of Legitimacy, ousted president Mohamed Morsi's main support bloc, has said it respects the recent decision of one of its constituent parties to withdraw from the bloc, noting that it planned to step up its efforts to attract more political forces to its cause.

The assertions came after the moderate-Islamist Wasat Party on Thursday announced its decision to pull out of the alliance.

In a Friday statement, the alliance stressed its appreciation for the Wasat Party's efforts in recent months to counter last year's "military coup" that unseated Morsi.

The National Alliance for the Defense of Legitimacy, which is made up of several Islamist parties, was formed in the run-up to Morsi's ouster by the military on July 3 of last year.

Since Morsi's ouster, the alliance has organized most opposition activities against Egypt's post-Morsi authorities.

In its statement, the alliance said it was making concerted efforts to unify Egyptian revolutionary forces and broaden the front against the "military coup."

One alliance member had earlier hinted at the possible reformation of the pro-Morsi bloc, promising more details at a later date.

Salafist leader Saad Fayad told Anadolu Agency that the bloc would be reformed to reflect the nature of Egypt's current political circumstances.

According to Fayad, more young people will be appointed to leading positions within the reformed alliance.

In November of last year, the pro-Morsi alliance issued a "strategic vision" with a view to resolving Egypt's political crisis.

It called for realizing justice for the victims of recent political violence, welcoming "sincere" initiatives for political dialogue, and ending Egypt's "military coup."

It did not, however, stipulate Morsi's reinstatement as president.

Morsi, who won Egypt's first free presidential election in 2012, was ousted by the military in July of last year following protests against his single year in office.

Former army chief Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, widely seen as the architect of Morsi's ouster and subsequent imprisonment, was declared winner of a presidential poll held in May.

Since Morsi's ouster almost 14 months ago, Egypt's military-backed authorities have waged a relentless crackdown on his supporters – and on other political dissidents – in which hundreds have been killed and thousands detained.

Morsi himself currently faces multiple criminal charges, all of which he emphatically denies, including espionage, jailbreak and "offending the judiciary."

The Egyptian government has blamed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood group for a series of deadly attacks on security personnel that came in the wake of Morsi's ouster – allegations the group says are politically driven.

Last Mod: 30 Ağustos 2014, 16:21
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