Al Fayed blasts bishop's plea for Diana peace

Mohamed Al Fayed has lashed out at a senior bishop's plea for the wrangling over Diana, princess of Wales' memory to cease, a newspaper reported on Sunday.

Al Fayed blasts bishop's plea for Diana peace
Mohamed Al Fayed has lashed out at a senior bishop's plea for the wrangling over Diana, princess of Wales' memory to cease, a newspaper reported on Sunday.


Al Fayed, the father of Diana's boyfriend Dodi Fayed, who was also killed by a tragic 1997 car crash in Paris, took a swipe at Richard Chartres, the bishop of London.

The Egyptian tycoon branded Chartres a "stuffed shirt" in an indication that next month's inquest — which Al Fayed is heavily involved in — will be a bitter affair, The Sunday Times reported.

"Let it end here," Chartres urged the congregation at Friday's memorial service for Diana — to which Al Fayed was not invited — which marked 10 years since the fatal crash which took her life at the age of 36.

Her sons Princes William, now 25, and Harry, 22, both spoke, with the younger royal delivering a touching speech about his mother.

"Prince Harry had the grace to acknowledge the suffering of other families who lost someone that night," Al Fayed said in a statement.

"This stuffed shirt of a clergyman should take lessons from the 22-year-old prince in how to behave. He certainly shouldn't have hijacked a memorial service dedicated to Diana, princess of Wales, to let us know various of his personal opinions — for that's all they were.

"He preached at us to let her memory rest, but how can that happen when the truth is still being covered up? As a religious man the bishop has no right to interfere in the court process which will establish what happened that night."

Last year, a report from Lord John Stevens, former head of London's Metropolitan Police, ruled out any conspiracy and said that the crash, which also killed the car's driver Henri Paul, was a "tragic accident."

Al Fayed alleges Diana and his eldest son were killed in an establishment plot concocted by senior royals.

The owner of the giant London emporium Harrods said he could not understand why Chartres, an executor of Diana's will, seemed to want to sideline his enduring quest.

"Anyone who loses a child in such a horrific way should be allowed to know what really happened and I am not resting until I uncover the murderers who took the lives of two beautiful people," Al Fayed said.

"A poll today says 89 percent of people think their deaths were not an accident. I get hundreds of letters of support each week. We need justice, for my family's sake, and for the sake of the princes."

AFP
Last Mod: 02 Eylül 2007, 14:56
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