Amazon to sell music without copy protection

Amazon.com is joining the movement against copy-protection software for digital music. It plans to sell songs that can be freely copied to any computer, cellphone or music player, including the iPod from Apple.

Amazon to sell music without copy protection
Amazon.com, the biggest online seller of CDs, is joining the movement against copy-protection software for digital music. It plans to sell songs that can be freely copied to any computer, cellphone or music player, including the iPod from Apple.

The move could be another step toward the demise of the copy-protection systems that have frustrated some online music buyers and created confusion about compatibility between digital players and downloaded songs. Critics charge that the software has slowed the public embrace of legal digital downloads while failing to stop illicit copying, at a time when the music industry is desperate for ways to make up for declining CD sales.

Amazon announced plans yesterday to add a music download store to its Web site this year. It will sell songs and albums in the MP3 format without the layer of software for digital rights management, or D.R.M., that is used by most other online music retailers.

Amazon said its service would include music from one major label, EMI, and from 12,000 independent music companies that have chosen not to use copy-restricting software.

“We are offering a great selection of music that our customers love in a way they clearly desire, which is D.R.M.-free, so they can play it on any device they own today or in the future,” said Bill Carr, Amazon’s vice president for digital media.

Amazon’s announcement comes three months after Steven P. Jobs, Apple’s chief executive, wrote an open letter to the music industry arguing that it should stop using D.R.M. He noted that consumers get unprotected music anyway when they buy CDs and copy the songs to their computers.
Last Mod: 17 Mayıs 2007, 11:38
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