Bosnian film to open 13th Sarajevo Film Festival

The world premiere of the movie Tesko Je Biti Fin (It's Hard to be Nice) by Bosnian director Srdjan Vuletic is to open the 13th Annual Sarajevo Film Festival (SFF) in the Bosnian capital Friday evening.

Bosnian film to open 13th Sarajevo Film Festival

The world premiere of the movie Tesko Je Biti Fin (It's Hard to be Nice) by Bosnian director Srdjan Vuletic is to open the 13th Annual Sarajevo Film Festival (SFF) in the Bosnian capital Friday evening.

The nine-day festival, the biggest in south-east Europe, is to offer 176 movies (including 16 world premiers) from more than 30 countries, screened at eight locations in the city.

The SFF focuses on the latest product from south-eastern Europe's film industry, but will also bring to Sarajevo the latest movie hits from all over the world.

The movies are presented in 13 programmes including competitive programmes for feature films, shorts and regional documentaries.

The festival also includes a programme designed for children and, as of this year, special educational activities within the SFF Talent Campus, organized in cooperation with the Berlin Film Festival.

Described by local media as the Cannes of the Balkans, the 13th SFF is to bring to Bosnian capital a number of internationally-known movie stars.

The list includes Oscar-awarded French star Juliette Binoche, who is to introduce director Anthony Minghella's latest movie Breaking and Entering, in which Binoche plays the Bosnian mother of a troubled teen.

American actor Steve Buscemi (Fargo, Reservoir Dogs)is also expected as a special guest of the festival, while his British colleague Jeremy Irons is to chair the jury for the feature film competition.

Many famous directors are also also attending the festival, including German director Fatih Akin (Head-On), Irishman Terry George (Hotel Rwanda), and American Alexander Payne (Sideways, About Schmidt).

Danis Tanovic, a Bosnian director who won the 2002 Oscar for his No Man's Land is to take part in the Talent Campus, as well as last year's Berlin Golden Bear winner Jasmila Zbanic (Grbavica: The Land of My Dreams).

The highest interest, however, remains for the controversial US director, Oscar and Cannes Festival winner Michael Moore, who is expected to appear in Sarajevo and officially close the festival with his latest piece Sicko.

Moore's arrival, however, was not confirmed yet due to his crowded schedule.

Also invited as special guest is controversial Austrian director Ulrich Seidl (Dog Days), whose movies would be presented in a special Tribute Programme.

During the last couple of days before the official opening on the festival people were queuing patiently in front of box offices for tickets, with those for the opening night sold immediately.

The Sarajevo Film Festival was established during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia-Herzegovina as a form of cultural resistance to the killings and massive destruction in the country.

The first SFF was held in summer 1994 in the basement of the Sarajevo Performing Arts Academy with the Bosnian premiere of Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction.

The festival has become the most respected film festival in the region and one of the 10 biggest film festivals in Europe.

DPA

Last Mod: 17 Ağustos 2007, 17:06
Add Comment