Brazil, Peru condemn Honduran refusal on Zelaya exit

Brazil and Peru condemned the refusal by the de facto government of Honduras to allow ousted Zelaya to leave the country

Brazil, Peru condemn Honduran refusal on Zelaya exit

Brazil and Peru on Saturday condemned the refusal by the de facto government of Honduras to allow ousted President Manuel Zelaya to leave the country unless he drops his demand to be reinstated.

Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva and Peruvian President Alan Garcia criticized the de facto government's stance in a joint statement issued by Brazil's Ministry of Foreign Relations. Zelaya, deposed in a June 28 coup, has taken refuge in Brazil's embassy in the Honduran capital.

"The presidents strongly condemn the unacceptable refusal by Honduras' de facto government's officials, totally defying the international rights, to allow the departure of constitutional president Jose Manuel Zelaya to Mexico," the statement said.

Zelaya said on Thursday the de facto government would allow him to leave the country only if he signs a letter dropping his demand to be reinstated as president. His term in office was scheduled to end on Jan. 27.

Soldiers grabbed Zelaya from his home on June 28 and threw him out of the country in his pajamas, sparking Central America's worst political crisis since the Cold War.

De facto leader Roberto Micheletti who took his place has defied world pressure to reinstate Zelaya, dividing the impoverished nation and provoking an international aid freeze. Zelaya took refuge in the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa, from where he has been demanding his reinstatement.

Honduran Congress voted last week not to allow him to finish his term that ends in January.

Lobo is due to take power in January.

Zelaya had planned to leave his refuge in the Brazilian Embassy on Wednesday for Mexico but the trip was aborted because of disagreement over whether he would accept political asylum.

The administration wants Zelaya to take political asylum in another country, which would restrict his political activities. However, Zelaya has rejected asylum in favor of a looser status that would allow him to campaign fully for his return.



Reuters

Last Mod: 13 Aralık 2009, 18:31
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