British group to march for Muslim victims of Afghan invasion

A British group plans to march through a town to remind Muslim victims of US-West invasion in Afghanistan.

British group to march for Muslim victims of Afghan invasion

A British group plans to march through a town to remind Muslim victims of US-West invasion in Afghanistan.

The group head has written an open letter to families of the soldiers killed in Afghan occupation why they plan the march.

The town is the first town where dead British soldiers arrive after conflict. The coffins pass through the town during repatriation.

Anjem Choudary said his organisation Islam4UK intended to hold a procession in the Wiltshire town of Wootton Bassett to highlight the deaths of innocent Muslim men, women and children who had been killed in the invasion.

In his letter, Choudary, who is the UK head of al-Muhajiroun, said he wanted to explain to family and friends of dead soldiers the reason of the proposed march.

"It is worth reminding those who are still not blinded by the media propaganda that Afghanistan is not a British Town near Wootton Basset but rather Muslim land which no one has the right to occupy, with a Muslim population who do not deserve their innocent men, women and children to be killed for political mileage and for the greedy interests of the oppressive US and UK regimes.

"The procession in Wootton Basset is therefore an attempt to engage the British publics minds on the real reasons why their soldiers are returning home in body bags and the real cost of the war."

The group's website states that the event is being organised "not in memory of the occupying and merciless British military" but instead of Muslims who have been "murdered in the name of democracy and freedom".

Earlier Mr Choudary, 42, a former lawyer, explained that the march was being held "not in memory of the occupying and merciless British military" but of the Muslims he says have been "murdered in the name of democracy and freedom".

Choudary, 42, a former lawyer from east London, said the march would be peaceful, with "symbolic coffins being carried to honour Muslim victims of the conflict." "it will not take place on the same day as a soldier's repatriation ceremony," he said.

But the British officials appear to be uneasy about the planned march.

"Anything which is considered to be offensive to or of concern to families of troops either wounded or killed in Afghanistan would be completely inappropriate," Brown's spokesman told reporters.

But Prime Minister Gordon Brown warned that anything that offended the families of dead soldiers would be "unacceptable".

The United Nations released figures this week showing that civilian deaths rose 10.8 percent in the first 10 months of 2009 to 2,038, up from 1,838 for the same period of 2008.

Obama early this month ordered 30,000 more U.S. troops to Afghan invasion, leading people fearing higher civilian casualties.

246 British soldiers have been killed in Afghanistan since the invasion in 2001.

There are already around 110,000 foreign troops for Afghanistan occupation.


Agencies


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Last Mod: 06 Ocak 2010, 16:44
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