Dink murder may expose Ergenekon hands in military

A recent development in the Hrant Dink murder case, may spell the end for the military branch of the Ergenekon gang, whose members have been working to topple AK Party government, a lawyer for the Dink family has said.

Dink murder may expose Ergenekon hands in military
A recent development in the Hrant Dink murder case, arguably the most important assassination in Turkey's recent history, may spell the end for the military branch of the Ergenekon gang, whose members have been working to topple the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government, a lawyer for the Dink family has said.

In an interview with Taraf's Neşe Düzel, Fethiye Çetin, a lawyer who represented Dink when he was alive, said the confession of two gendarmes that they had been warned about the assassination amounts to a new chapter in the trial. The fact that the two soldiers are able to speak freely and continue their duties in the gendermerie implies that a structure within the military resorting to illegitimate means and committing crimes might have been dissolved.

Dink was shot dead outside his office in January of last year in broad daylight by an ultra-nationalist teenager. The ensuing investigation resulted in 19 arrests and also revealed that the İstanbul police had been tipped off about the murder more than once before his shooting. In an unexpected twist last month, two gendarmes confessed that they were in the know about the plot and had informed their commanders, who ordered them to keep silent.

Çetin said the soldiers' confessions also confirm long-held suspicions that a nationalist gang called Ergenekon -- that allegedly has access to circles in the state and military and was unearthed in an operation that began last June -- might be behind the Dink murder.

There are currently 39 individuals, including retired army officers, under arrest for membership in this group, suspected, among many other attacks, of a hand grenade attack against the Cumhuriyet daily and the killing of a senior judge at the Council of State in 2006. Prosecutors say documents found during raids related to Ergenekon show that the gang sought to set the country up for a military coup d'état that would end the rule of the AK Party government, elected to power by 47 percent of the vote last summer.

Çetin expressed her opinion in the interview that the two gendarmes' confessions might be indicative that soon the non-civilian branches of Ergenekon will be exposed following the disbanding of the illegal structure's military parts.




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Last Mod: 01 Nisan 2008, 14:05
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