Foot-and-mouth laboratory results by Tuesday

British Government inspectors probing the suspected source of a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Surrey, outside London, hope to have the results of their inquiries in the next 36 hours, the Government said Monday.

Foot-and-mouth laboratory results by Tuesday
British Government inspectors probing the suspected source of a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Surrey, outside London, hope to have the results of their inquiries in the next 36 hours, the Government said Monday.

The UK Health and Safety Executive is examining whether the Pirbright site could have been the source of the outbreak which was confirmed last Friday.

Two facilities at the Pirbright complex were using a strain of the virus for research and for vaccines.

It was the same strain found at an infected farm four miles away.

Inspectors are initially focusing their investigation on private pharmaceutical company "Merial", which develops vaccines, as it had most recently used the strain.
Both it and the publicly funded Institute for Animal Health research facility, deny there has been a breach in biosecurity.

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has asked for the results of the investigation to be available by tomorrow.

Brown said the efforts were to "contain, control, and then eradicate this disease." He said the ban on the movement of cows, sheep, and pigs would remain in place.
The UK Department for the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) said around 120 cows in all had been culled in response to the outbreak.

Susceptible animals on a farm next to the affected premises had been slaughtered as a precaution because of "potentially dangerous contact," Defra officials said.

In a statement, Defra said "The present indications are that this strain is a 01 BFS67-like virus, isolated in the 1967 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Great Britain." A ban on the movement of all livestock is in place in England, Scotland, and Wales.

Northern Ireland has imposed a ban on all cattle, sheep, and pigs from Britain, but there are currently no restrictions on the movement of livestock within the Province and across the border in the Republic of Ireland.

Britain has also imposed a voluntary ban on exports of all animals and animal products and the European Commission said it would ban live animal exports from the UK.
The last outbreak of foot-and-mouth in 2001 led to between 6.5 million and 10 million animals being destroyed and cost the British economy as much as 8.5 billion pounds.

Agencies
Last Mod: 06 Ağustos 2007, 16:22
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