Iran advises major powers to recognise nuclear rights

Major powers will only achieve results in their meetings on Iran if they adopt a "realistic approach" and recognise its nuclear rights, the spokesman said.

Iran advises major powers to recognise nuclear rights

Major powers will only achieve results in their meetings on Iran if they adopt a "realistic approach" and recognise its nuclear rights, the Islamic Republic's Foreign Ministry spokesman said on Sunday.

Ramin Mehmanparast made the comment a day after the six powers ended a meeting without a decision on new sanctions over Iranian nuclear programme.

Iran's official IRNA news agency said Mehmanparast described the powers' failure to reach an agreement on Iran's nuclear issue as natural.

Diplomats from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China held a three-hour meeting in New York on Saturday.

"The solution lies in the recognition of Iran's nuclear rights by the group," Mehmanparast said. "The planned meetings of the (six powers) would not have clear results as long as they lack a realistic approach."

Beijing, which has been cool to a fourth round of sanctions on Tehran backed by the West, sent a lower-level diplomat, while the other countries were represented by political directors of their respective foreign ministries.

China, which has close economic and energy ties with Iran, has said new sanctions would be premature and that more time should be given for diplomacy to work.

Tehran rejects a proposal under which most of Iran's low enriched uranium (LEU) stockpile would be shipped abroad to be further enriched into reactor fuel.

Tehran has ignored a US-set December 31 deadline to accept the offer, drawn up by the UN International Atomic Energy Agency, and countered with its own proposal of a simultaneous and staged swap of LEU with reactor fuel.

Iran says it is ready to send its LEU abroad only if there is a simultaneous exchange of fuel inside the country.

Iran says it enriches uranium for civilian applications and that as a signatory to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, it has a right to the technology already in the hands of many others.

However, most experts estimate that Israel has at least between 100 and 200 nuclear warheads, largely based on information leaked to the Sunday Times newspaper in the 1980s by Mordechai Vanunu, a former worker at the country's Dimona nuclear reactor.

Israel, which has initiated several wars in the region in its 60-year history, has not denied having nuclear weapons, but has not signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and open its facilities for IAEA perusal.

Israel also often threatens Iran an attack over its nuclear sites.


Agencies


Last Mod: 17 Ocak 2010, 14:46
Add Comment