Jordanian MPs rule out extradition of Saddam's daughter

Prominent Jordanian lawmakers on Sunday ruled out the possibility of extraditing Raghad, the eldest daughter of executed Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, to Iraqi authorities.

Jordanian MPs rule out extradition of Saddam's daughter

Prominent Jordanian lawmakers on Sunday ruled out the possibility of extraditing Raghad, the eldest daughter of executed Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, to Iraqi authorities.

"I completely rule out the possibility of Jordan's extradition of Raghad, given the fact that she has no media activity in Jordan," Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee at the lower house of Parliament, Mohammad Abu Hudaib, told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa.

Abu Hudaib was responding to an arrest warrant issued by Interpol in Baghdad Saturday for the 38-year-old daughter of the former Iraqi dictator on charges of terrorism and crimes against innocent people.

Raghad fled to Jordan along with her sister, Rana, and their children four months after the US-led invasion of Iraq and the collapse of Saddam's regime in 2003.

Since then, Saddam's two daughters and their children have been considered"guests" of King Abdullah II' Hashemite royal family.

The Jordanian government has withheld any official reaction to the arrest warrant report, but the pro-government Jordan Times quoted a senior official spokesman as saying that his government "usually do not react to reports circulating in the press".

"There are internationally recognized procedures that take place for this type of issue," the official said without giving details.

Abu Hudaib said that "the present security and legal chaos in Iraq make it imperative for the Jordanian government to reject the extradition of Raghad to Iraqi officials who cannot protect even themselves".

"Raghad has taken refuge in Jordan and according to the observed Arab traditions, a refugee should not be handed over against his will," he added.

Abu Hudaib contended that Interpol's "Red Notice" "does not rank to an international arrest warrant but rather it a request for foreign police forces to cooperate in investigating the charges" against the daughter of the former Iraqi president.

When Raghad was included in the list of most-wanted persons in Iraq last year, Jordanian parliamentarians conducted a study showing that the Criminal Extradition Law first drafted in 1927 "prohibits the extradition of any person if the request made for that is driven by political motives".

The Interpol arrest warrant for Raghad was issued only two days after the Iraqi National Security Advisor Muwaffaq al-Rubaie ended a visit to Jordan at the head of a security delegation.

Iraqi delegation members leaked information to the local press that they were seeking the extradition of Iraqis, who worked with the former Iraqi regime in return for Jordanians currently held in Iraq for fighting alongside al-Qaeda against US troops.

However, al-Rubaie said at a press conference in Amman that Iraqi authorities would be seeking only the extradition of people against whom court verdicts had been issued.

The Islamic Action Front (IAF), Jordan's main political party, also rejected Sunday the extradition of Raghad, saying "those who fuelled terrorism by bringing the US invasion forces deserve trial".

"We urge the government to reject the Interpol arrest warrant against Raghad," Azzam Hunaimid, head of the IAF parliamentary bloc at the lower house of parliament, told dpa.

"Those who brought the US invasion are the real killers and criminals and, accordingly, should be charged with terrorism," he added.


DPA

Last Mod: 19 Ağustos 2007, 19:20
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