banner6

Muslims begin celebrating ay Eid-ul-Fitr

Muslims begin celebrating 3-day Eid-ul-Fitr festival in most of the Islamic countries. Eid is a time to come together as a community and to renew friendship and family ties. This is a time for peace for all Muslims in the world to devote to prayers and mu

Muslims begin celebrating ay Eid-ul-Fitr

Muslims begin celebrating 3-day Eid-ul-Fitr festival in most of the Islamic countries today. "`Eid" is an Arabic word referring to something habitual, that returns and is repeated. `Eids or festivals are symbols to be found in every nation, including those that are based on revealed scriptures and those that are idolatrous, as well as others, because celebrating festivals is something that is an instinctive part of human nature. All people like to have special occasions to celebrate, where they can come together and express their joy and happiness.

The festivities and merriment start after the prayers with visits to the homes of friends and relatives and thanking the Creator for all blessings. Eid is a time to come together as a community and to renew friendship and family ties. This is a time for peace for all Muslims in the world to devote to prayers and mutual well-being.

It is a joyous occasion with important religious significance. Happiness is observed at attaining spiritual uplift after a month of fasting. Muslims dress in holiday attire. After attending the special congregational prayer in the morning, worshippers greet and embrace each other in a spirit of peace, love, and brotherhood. Visiting friends and relatives is common.

For Muslims, Eid ul-Fitr is a joyful celebration of the achievement of enhanced piety. It is a day of forgiveness, moral victory and peace, of congregation, fellowship, brotherhood and unity. Muslims are not only celebrating the end of fasting, but thanking God for the help and strength that they believe he gave them throughout the previous month to help them practice self-control.

The first Eid was celebrated in 624 CE by the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) with his friends and relatives after the victory of the battle of Jang-e-Badar. Muslims are not only celebrating the end of fasting, but thanking Allah for the help and strength that he gave them throughout the previous month to help them practice self-control. The festival begins when the first sight of the new moon is seen in the sky.

Muslims in most countries rely on news of an official sighting, rather than looking at the sky themselves. The celebratory atmosphere is increased by everyone wearing best or new clothes, and decorating their homes. There are special services out of doors and in Mosques, processions through the streets, and of course, a special celebratory meal - eaten during daytime, the first daytime meal Muslims will have had in a month. Eid is also a time of forgiveness, and making amends.

Pictures of the Eid-ul Fitr from the Islamic World;

Masjid Umar mosque

Eid al-Fir prayer outside the Imam Turki mosque at sunrise in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Muslims pray at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem's Old City

Eid-ul-Fitr

Egyptians perform Eid prayers in a street outside Mustafa Mahmoud mosque in Cairo, Thursday Dec. 5, 2002. (AP Photo/Mohammad al sehety)

Thousands of Egyptians crowd into a public square in Cairo for dawn prayers of the first day of Eid el-Fitr, a Muslim feast, December 5, 2002. The feast ends the Holy month of Ramadan, during which Muslims all over the world fast from sunrise to sunset.    REUTERS/Aladin Abdel Naby

Indian Muslims take part in the prayer to mark the end of the month of Ramadan with the holy Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr at Kotla Feroz Shah Mosque, in New Delhi, India, Friday Dec. 6, 2002. The Muslim festival of Eid held added tension in communal hotspots across India as it fell on the 10th anniversary of the demolition of a 16 century mosque by Hindu extremist. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)

Iranian Muslims pray at the grand mosque of Imam Khominei, during the Muslim holiday Eid, the fast breaking feast that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan in Tehran, Friday Dec. 6, 2002. (AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian)

A disabled Afghan man prays in front of Kabul's Eid-Gah mosque during celebrations for the Muslim festival Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, December 5, 2002. Afghan police said they prevented a deadly explosion at a main mosque in the capital after finding several kilograms of explosives and two hand grenades before the start of the religious festival. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti

Thousands of Indian Muslims offer their prayers on a main road in Calcutta on December 6, 2002. Muslims across the world are celebrating Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan.                 REUTERS/Jayanta Shaw

Indian Muslims pray to mark the end of the month of Ramadan with the holy Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr the streets of Calcutta, India, Friday Dec. 6, 2002. The Muslim festival of Eid held added tension in communal hotspots across India as it fell on the 10th anniversary of the demolition of a 16 century mosque by Hindu extremist. (AP Photo/Bikas Das)

Yasser Ibrahim, 10,  prays prays in Jamia Mosque during the Eid el-Fitr festival in Nairobi Friday Dec. 6. 2002.  Eid marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan during which Muslims all over the world fast from sunrise to sunset. (AP Photo/Khalil Senosi)

A young child attends morning Eid prayers outside a Jakarta mosque, December 6, 2002. Millions of Muslims around the world are celebrating Eid Al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan.                  REUTERS/Enny Nuraheni

A young child plays as Muslims attend morning Eid prayers outside a Jakarta shopping mall on December 6, 2002. Millions of Muslims around the world are celebrating Eid Al-Fitr, which marks the end of holy month of Ramadan.   REEUTERS/Suryawan

A woman prays for Eid al-Fitr in Abidjan, Ivory Coast

A woman holds her child as she prays in Jakarta, Indonesia

A Bosnian Muslim girl visits a grave at a Sarajevo cemetery

A Bosnian Muslim boy stands among tombstones at the Bare cemetery in Sarajevo on the first day of the Eid al-Fitr, December 5, 2002. Despite poor weather, Muslims gathered at mosques and cemeteries to pray on the first day of their biggest Islamic feast, Eid el-Fitr, nearing the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.    REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

 

Iraqi children play in Sadr City, Baghdad, at the start of Eid al-Fitr

Pakistani girls show their hands painted with henna 

Eid marks the end of Ramadan, a muslim holy month in which eating only after dark is allowed. Palestinian women buy sweets to celebrate 

Here Iraqi children carry sweets on the streets of Baghdad as they celebrate the first day of Eid al-Fitr on Tuesday 

A Muslim family celebrates Eid al-Fitr in Xining, thecapital of northwest China's Qinghai Province on Thursday Dec. 5, 2002. Eid al-Fitr marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, during which observant Muslims fast from dawn to dusk. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Han Yuqing)

Masjid Umar mosque

Eid Celebrations

Masjid Umar mosque

Eid Celebrations

Masjid Umar mosque

Masjid Umar mosque

 

Last Mod: 00 0000, 00:00
Add Comment