PACE expects Turkey's top court to be in line with EU principles

President said "Our aim is to give a message and express PACE's sensitivity about AK Party closure case."

PACE expects Turkey's top court to be in line with EU principles
The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) expressed hope on Monday that Turkey's top court will decide in line with European principles regarding the closure case against Turkey's ruling party.

PACE President Lluis Maria de Puig said that the parliamentary assembly expected Turkey's Constitutional Court to make a decision in line with the principles of the European Convention on Human Rights and Venice Commission, regarding the closure case against the ruling Justice & Development (AK) Party.

The chief prosecutor of Turkey's Supreme Court of Appeals filed a lawsuit on March 14th, asking the top court of Turkey to close AK Party. He claimed, "the party has become the focal point of anti-secular activities."

In a press conference he held in Strasbourg at the opening of the summer session, Puig said that there would be a session on "the functioning of democratic institutions in Turkey" on Thursday.

Puig said that the closure case against AK Party would be discussed in the session.

"Our aim is not to intervene in Turkey's internal affairs, but to give a message and express PACE's sensitivity about this matter," he told reporters.

Puig said PACE wanted preservation of both nation's and judiciary's will in Turkey, and the parliamentary assembly wanted to contribute to discussions in Turkey.

"What we expect from Turkey is to make decisions in which reason and commonsense prevail," the president said.

The president also said that the parliamentary assembly intended to express its opinion when developments were occurring, instead of waiting for occurrence of crisis.

During the spring plenary session of PACE, the presidents of four political groups signed a declaration which wished that the decision the Constitutional Court would make about the closure case would be in line with the principles of the Council of Europe and Venice Commission.

The European Commission for Democracy through Law, better known as the Venice Commission, is the Council of Europe's advisory body on constitutional matters.

Established in 1990, the commission has played a leading role in the adoption of constitutions that conform to the standards of Europe's constitutional heritage.

Initially conceived as a tool for emergency constitutional engineering, the commission has become an internationally recognised independent legal think-tank.

It contributes to the dissemination of the European constitutional heritage, based on the continent's fundamental legal values while continuing to provide "constitutional first-aid" to individual states. The Venice Commission also plays a unique and unrivalled role in crisis management and conflict prevention through constitution building and advice.


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Last Mod: 23 Haziran 2008, 15:06
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