Qaradawi Deplores Algiers Bombings

Prominent Muslim scholar Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the president of the International Union for Muslim Scholars (IUMS), has deplored two suicide bomb attacks in the Algerian capital that left over 200 casualties.

Qaradawi Deplores Algiers Bombings

Prominent Muslim scholar Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the president of the International Union for Muslim Scholars (IUMS), has deplored two suicide bomb attacks in the Algerian capital that left over 200 casualties.

This is "an aggression against innocent civilians who committed nothing to have their blood shed," Qaradawi said in a cable to Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika on Thursday, April 12.

At least 33 people were killed and 222 others wounded when two blasts rocked the capital Algiers on Wednesday, April 11.

The self-declared Al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb claimed responsibility for the bombings.

We condemn "the indiscriminate killing of people in the name of Islam and Jihad," Qaradawi said.

"Islam calls for ceasing bloods and respect of rights of people and even animals. They had the gall to kill innocent civilians for no apparent reason."

He said "Muslim blood should not be shed save in certain crimes outlined by the judiciary."

"Killing is a major crime that requires punishment in this life and the Hereafter," Qaradawi affirmed.

Wednesday's bombings have drawn widespread Muslim and world condemnation.

Malaysia, the current chair of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, said Islam was against violence and those who follow the true teaching of Islam would not resort to violence.

The Iranian foreign ministry also described the blasts as an "inhuman and ugly act" while Jordan's King Abdullah II denounced the "cowardly acts that have nothing to do with Islam".

The UN Security Council also condemned the twin bombings and urged all states to help Algiers bring the perpetrators and sponsors to justice.

"Misled"

Qaradawi regretted that the two suicide bombers and the masterminds of such grisly operations were "misled."

"We call on them to return to the right path, come out of their shell, and give a second reading to their wrong perceptions," Qaradawi said.

"They should approach scholars and listen to them to have their blinkers off."

Qaradawi called on Muslims worldwide to close their ranks and pursue dialogue to solve their differences.

He also backed the efforts of the Algerian president to promote reconciliation in the country.

Algeria descended into a bloody and vicious cycle of violence in early 1992 after the then military-backed government annulled the results of the legislative polls in which the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) was set to secure a landslide victory.

The authorities then disbanded the Islamic movement and unleashed a crackdown on its members, triggering a bloody armed conflict that lingered on for several years, claiming the lives of some 200,000 people, mostly civilians.

That violence subsided in recent years following amnesties initiated by Bouteflika for those who took up arms against the state.

Last Mod: 20 Eylül 2018, 18:16
Add Comment