Somalia's civilian deaths down in 2009 after Ethiopian withdrawal

A fall in street battles in the capital Mogadishu led to significantly fewer civilians being killed in Somalia this year, a human rights group said.

Somalia's civilian deaths down in 2009 after Ethiopian withdrawal


A fall in street battles in the capital Mogadishu led to significantly fewer civilians being killed in Somalia this year, a human rights group said on Wednesday.

The Mogadishu-based Elman Peace and Human Rights Organisation said 1,739 civilians were killed in fighting in Somalia this year, down from 7,574 in 2008 and 8,636 in 2007.

"The death toll was lower this year because there was no serious face-to-face fighting in Mogadishu, but beheadings and the exchange of shells in a hit-and-run war," said Ali Yasin Gedi, Elman's vice chairman. 

Armed opposition groups launched an insurgency at the start of 2007 to drive out Ethiopian troops propping up the Western-backed government in the Horn of Africa nation. There were heavy clashes in Mogadishu and other parts of southern and central Somalia until the Ethiopians left at the start of this year.

They see any presence of foreign troops as an "occupation". Following the end of "occupation" of Ethiopian troops, the street clashes was dawn, sharply decreasing the civilian deads. 

A former opposition fighter, Sheikh Sharif Ahmed, was elected president in January. While there were hopes he would be able to reconcile with the fighters he has made little headway and the government controls only a few blocks of Mogadishu.

But there have been fewer full-blown clashes between government troops and fighters in the capital during 2009.

Fighters camped in densely populated parts of Mogadishu have focused more on attacking government targets and African Union (AU) peacekeepers with suicide bombs and mortar shells.

"Most of the casualties took place in Mogadishu where AU and the government on one side and the rebels exchanged shells," Gedi said.

He said at least 4,911 civilians were wounded and some 3,900 families were displaced by clashes this year, adding to what is already one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis. 

Reuters

Last Mod: 30 Aralık 2009, 23:15
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