Stress at work may trigger depression

Having a stressful job with a nagging boss may trigger bouts of mental illnesses, according to a new study by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London.

Stress at work may trigger depression

Having a stressful job with a nagging boss may trigger bouts of mental illnesses, according to a new study by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London.

The details of the study appear in the latest edition of the journal Psychological Medicine.

The study involved 972 people in Dunedin, New Zealand. Of them 891 were employed and held regular jobs as farmers, IT experts, fishermen, politicians, stockbrokers, electricians, policemen or teachers. The participants' had had their health monitored from the age of three.

The researchers analyzed the stress on the job by looking at parameters like level of skill required, workload, time pressures and support from supervisors or managers as the case may be.

"Our study shows work stress appears to bring on diagnosable forms of depression and anxiety in previously healthy young workers," said lead author Dr Maria Melchior, of the Institute of Psychiatry. "We found that high work pressure, high workload, working very quickly to tight inflexible deadlines doubled the risk of depression and anxiety."

Among the participants some 14 percent of women and 10 percent of men had experienced their first depressive episode within the last 12 months. Researchers said 45 percent of these episodes could be directly attributed to stress at work.

The criteria issued by the American Psychiatric Association were used to determine if the participants were depressed or anxious, researchers stressed.

"A lot of jobs have changed over time. The affects of commuting, longer hours and having to combine work and family life for many would appear to be playing a part," Dr Melchior pointed out.

Study co-author Terrie Moffitt, Professor of Social Behaviour and Development at King's, said that high stress jobs need not be the highest paid ones. "Head chefs in big restaurants are under huge time pressures and the pressure of public failure and being exposed if they screw up," she said.

Agencies

Last Mod: 02 Ağustos 2007, 14:34
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