banner6

Sweden Muslims on Cartoon Crisis

Swedish Muslims have no intention of internationalizing a new crisis involving lampooning drawing of Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing be upon him), opting for a series of peaceful protests at home.

Sweden Muslims on Cartoon Crisis

Swedish Muslims have no intention of internationalizing a new crisis involving lampooning drawing of Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing be upon him), opting for a series of peaceful protests at home.

"Swedish Muslims don't want to escalate the situation," Mohamed Al-Khalafi, the head of the Muslim Association of Sweden, told IslamOnline.net.

"Nerikes Allehanda is a small newspaper that sought to provoke Muslims for publicity reasons."

Last week, the daily published a drawing depicting the head of a man the paper called Prophet Muhammad on the body of a dog.

The paper printed the cartoon, part of a series made by Swedish artist Lars Vilks, after art galleries in Sweden had declined to display them.

Khalafi said that the blasphemous drawing infuriated Swedish Muslims, estimated at 500,000 of the country's nine million population.

"But we hope to solve this issue domestically and peacefully," he said.

"There have been many positive reactions that must be seized upon. Many major newspapers in Sweden have refused to print the drawing."

Iran had summoned the Swedish charge d'affaires in Tehran to protest the drawing as a sacrilege to religious sentiments of over one billion Muslims.

In September 2005, Denmark's mass-circulation daily Jyllands-Posten printed 12 cartoons including portrayals of a man the newspaper called Prophet Muhammad, wearing a bomb-shaped turban and another showing him as a knife-wielding nomad flanked by shrouded women.

The insulting cartoons triggered a firestorm of protests across the Muslim world and strained Muslim-West ties.

Protests

Swedish Muslims plan a series of peaceful protests over the insulting drawing.

"The Islamic Culture Center in Orebro will organize a protest in front of Nerikes Allehanda on Friday," said spokesman Gamal Al-Mohamadi.

"We want peaceful protests," noted Khalafi.

He said Swedish Muslims are also mulling the possibility of taking their case to court.

"We are discussing filing a lawsuit against the newspaper," he said, adding that a final decision would be taken by the weekend.

Following the Danish cartoons crisis, Muslim scholars, priests and rabbis have called for a UN Security Council resolution criminalizing blasphemy.

The crisis has prompted Muslims in Denmark and worldwide to champion local campaigns to wash away widely circulated misconceptions about Prophet Muhammad.

A galaxy of Muslim scholars recently established an international organization and a fund for defending Prophet Muhammad against defamatory attacks in the West.


IOL

Last Mod: 31 Ağustos 2007, 22:07
Add Comment