Two US banks close, total hits 22

Regulators seized two U.S. banks in Nevada and Washington state, bringing the year total to 22 as small institutions continue to struggle with bad loans.

Two US banks close, total hits 22

Regulators seized two U.S. banks in Nevada and Washington state on Friday, bringing the year total to 22 as small institutions continue to struggle with bad loans.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp said Rainier Pacific Bank in Tacoma, Washington was closed, and its deposits were assumed by Umpqua Bank of Roseburg, Oregon.

Carson River Community Bank in Carson City, Nevada also was closed, and its deposits were assumed by Heritage Bank of Nevada, Reno, Nevada, the FDIC said.

The agency said earlier this week that the number of "problem" U.S. banks jumped 27 percent during the fourth quarter of 2009 to 702, the highest level since 1993 and a sign that the industry's recovery remains uneven.

The vast majority of those banks do not fail, but the size of the list indicates the number of institutions with significant weaknesses.

Rainier Pacific Bank had about $717.8 million in total assets and $446.2 million in total deposits as of Dec. 31, 2009, the FDIC said.

It said Umpqua Bank would pay the FDIC a premium of 1.04 percent to assume the failed bank's deposits. It also was buying about $670.1 million of Rainier Pacific Bank's assets, and entered in a loss-share transaction on $578.1 million.

Carson River Community Bank had about $51.1 million in total assets and $50 million in total deposits as of Dec. 31, 2009, the FDIC said.

Heritage Bank of Nevada did not pay the FDIC a premium to assume the deposits of the closed bank. It agreed to buy about $38 million of the failed bank's assets and entered into a loss-share transaction on $28.5 million of the assets.

The FDIC said Rainier Pacific Bank's closing would cost the FDIC's insurance fund $95.2 million, while Carson River Community Bank's closing would cost the fund $7.9 million.

The FDIC on Tuesday reported that additional provisions for expected bank failures sunk the balance of the FDIC's insurance fund even further to a negative $20.9 billion at the end of the year.

Despite a negative balance for the FDIC's insurance fund, which safeguards accounts up to $250,000, the agency says it had about $66 billion in cash resources as of the end of the year to operate and back customer accounts.

Smaller institutions are still struggling with deteriorating loan portfolios, especially with loans tied to commercial real estate. The FDIC set aside an additional $17.8 billion during the fourth quarter for expected bank failures.

Since January 2008, 187 banks have failed. Regulators have said 2010 will likely be the peak year for failures in this banking crisis.

Reuters

Last Mod: 27 Şubat 2010, 12:55
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