US, superpowers accused of climate enemy

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) accused the US, the world's economic and military superpower, of being climate enemy number one and ignoring science when it comes to global warming combat.

US, superpowers accused of climate enemy
The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) accused the US, the world's economic and military superpower, of being climate enemy number one and ignoring science when it comes to global warming combat.

"They are the biggest culprit and they are the biggest offender of climate," Stephan Singer, head of WWF's climate change policy unit, was quoted as saying by Agence France Presse (AFP).

Addressing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the UN global warming authority, he accused the US, the world's top greenhouse gas emitter, of overlooking global warming.

"The United States should take climate change seriously."

The WWF official urged the US government to take actions to reduce the dangerous phenomenon that already inflicted and damaged the ecosystem.

Hans Verolme, director of WWF's global climate change program, made the same appeal.

"What's happening in the US is important because it is still the largest emitter" of greenhouse gas, he said.

"The US should take on economy-wise carbon reduction targets."

America consumes around a quarter of global energy and causes nearly 30 percent of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions.

President George W. Bush's administration has adamantly refused to ratify the 1995 Kyoto Protocol, the main world treaty for greenhouse-gas reductions, saying it would hurt the economy.

Scientists and government officials from more than 100 countries have been meeting in Bangkok since Monday to discuss the IPCC's third report over human-induced climate change.

The IPCC concluded on Friday, February 2, that global warming was almost certainly caused by humans and will be unstoppable for centuries to come.

It also predicted water shortages that could affect billions of people and a rise in ocean levels that could go on for centuries.

Indonesian Forests

The US was not the only country singled out for criticism.

"Of the 44 countries which collectively account for 90 percent of the world's forests, the country which pursues the highest annual rate of deforestation is Indonesia," Greenpeace said in a statement.

It said the Asian archipelago has the fastest pace of deforestation worldwide.

Indonesia had "1.8 million hectares (4.4 million acres) of forest destroyed each year between 2000-2005, a rate of two percent annually or 51 square kilometers (20 square miles) destroyed every day," said the environment-defender group.

It warned that the next generation of Indonesians will not see any forest if no action is taken by the government to deal with the problem.

Greenpeace urged the Jakarta government to impose a temporary ban on commercial logging in natural forests nationwide, accusing authorities of failing to control lawlessness and corruption in the forestry sector.

Indonesia has called on Monday, April 9, for a worldwide boycott of wooden products made of illegally logged timber.

A report released by the Environmental Investigation Agency and Indonesia-based Telapak named and shamed Malaysia and China as major recipients of stolen Indonesian timber.

Environmentalists said illegal logging in Indonesia strips 2.1 million hectares (5.2 million acres) of forest every year.

They said the $4-billion trade greatly prejudices the environment.
Last Mod: 04 Mayıs 2007, 10:57
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