Uzbek parties share out parliament seats

All four parties whose candidates have been awarded seats in the lower house in parliament support President Islam Karimov, in power for two decades.

Uzbek parties share out parliament seats
Most parliamentary seats have been allocated after Uzbekistan's stage-managed election held on Sunday, in which only pro-government parties were allowed to stand, local media reported on Tuesday.

Central Asia's most populous nation, Uzbekistan has never held a vote judged free and fair by observers but the West has kept quiet during the latest poll, seeking to engage Tashkent more closely in NATO invasion in Afghanistan.

All four parties whose candidates have been awarded seats in the lower house in parliament support President Islam Karimov, in power for two decades.

"According to preliminary data ... 94 deputies have been elected in the first round," the Central Election Commission said in a statement, adding that voter turnout was 87.8 percent.

The remaining 41 deputies will be elected in run-off polls while 15 members of the 150-seat chamber will be nominated by the Ecological Movement of Uzbekistan.

The commission refused to provide any information on the early results of the poll by telephone. It did not say when the run-offs would take place. Final results are due by Jan. 6.

Uzbek news agency 12.uz reported on Tuesday that so far, the Liberal Democratic party led the polls, having secured 34 seats.

National Revival Party "Milly Tiklanish" has won 24 seats, People's Democratic Party of Uzbekistan has 22 and Social Democratic Party "Adolat" has 14 seats, it said.

In the run-up to the poll the four parties publicly criticised each other, mainly over social policy, while praising Karimov's achievements.

Uzbekistan, widely condemned following a 2005 protest in the town of Andizhan where government troops shot dead civilians.

Since then Washington has stepped up diplomatic contacts with Tashkent and the European Union lifted all sanctions on the Central Asian state in October citing human rights "progress".


Reuters





Last Mod: 29 Aralık 2009, 15:52
Add Comment