International Imam-i Rabbani symposium starts in Istanbul

Known as the “reviver of the second millennium”, the Indian Islamic scholar brings the messages, rejuvenating Islam beyond centuries.

International Imam-i Rabbani symposium starts in Istanbul

World Bulletin/News Desk

An international symposium named after a prominent Islamic scholar, Imam-ı Rabbani, launched on Friday in Istanbul. Known as the “reviver of the second millennium”, the Indian Islamic scholar brings the messages, rejuvenating Islam beyond centuries.

A three-day symposium organized by the Aziz Mahmut Hudayi Foundation and Istanbul Sufi Studies Center started with an opening ceremony at the Halic Congress Center. Turkish Religious Affairs Directorate President Mehmet Gormez, Parliament Speaker Cemil Cicek and Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag were also in the attendance at the ceremony along with more than 40 academicians around the world.

Speaking at the opening ceremony which started with a Quran recitation, Mehmet Gormez said works of Imam-i Rabbani managed to address various types of people in the society.

“Sometimes he gives an answer to a question of an ordinary people. He sent letters people around the world not only those in his region. Although about four centuries passed over (the time the letters written), people, no matter which century, country they live in, can have a feeling that they (the letters) have been written to only themselves. His letters actually beyond his own time.”

Imām Rabbānī Shaykh Ahmad al-Farūqī al-Sirhindī (1564–1624) was an Indian Islamic scholar, a Hanafi jurist, and a prominent member of the Naqshbandī Sufi order. He is described as Mujaddid Alf Thānī, meaning the "reviver of the second millennium", for his work in rejuvenating Islam.

Most of the Naqshbandī suborders today, such as the Mujaddidī, Khālidī, Saifī, Tāhirī, Qasimiya and Haqqānī sub-orders, trace their spiritual lineage through Sirhindi, often referring to themselves as "Naqshbandī-Mujaddidī".

Sirhindi's shrine, known as Rauza Sharif is located in Sirhind, India.

Most famous of his works are a collection of 536 letters, collectively entitled Collected Letters or Maktubat, to the Mughal rulers and other contemporaries. It was reproduced by offset process in Istanbul, Turkey. A copy of the Arabic version occupies number 53 in the municipality library in Bayezid, Istanbul.

Last Mod: 15 Kasım 2013, 17:07
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