Jerusalem's Damascus Gate: An unprotected world heritage

Once used for the protection of one of the world's most sacred cities, the Damascus Gate attracts more attention today for its historical and architectural aspects.

Jerusalem's Damascus Gate: An unprotected world heritage

EDIZ TIYANSAN - KUZEY NEWS AGENCY

UNESCO has decided to finally bring the Damascus Gate of Jerusalem located in the Old City under it's protection. However, UNESCO is yet to undertake much needed restoration works on the gate. The Gate, which was built by Ottoman Emperor Suleiman the Magnificent, has witnessed the history of Jerusalem for centuries.

Leading to the Old City, the Damascus Gate links the north of Palestine through Nablus to Damascus, the Syrian capital. This is why the gate is called the Damascus Gate, but is also known as Pole Gate among Arabs with a clear reference to a Roman building that dates back to second century. Following numerous renovations, both Ayyubids and Crusaders constructed some additional parts.

Today's Damascus Gate has been preserved since 1537, when Suleiman the Magnificent had it built. Located on both sides of the gate, towers are bound to the walls surrounding the old city. The loophole put over the gate was used during attacks for the purpose of defending the city. Rumors suggest that during armed conflicts, heated oil was deliberately spilt over their adversaries from these loopholes.

Once used for the protection of one of the world's most sacred cities, the Damascus Gate attracts more attention today for its historical and architectural aspects.

According to religious books and historical findings, the old city's foundation traces back to the eleventh century BCE. The walls and gates of Old Jerusalem was added to UNESCO's world heritage list to protect it from harm. However, UNESCO has fallen short on its promises.

Last Mod: 21 Mart 2014, 11:40
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