Restoration of İshak Paşa Palace completed-PHOTO

The destroyed walls of the palace were reconstructed, the stone dressings were all repaired and watersheds were built around the palace to protect it from rain and snow.

Restoration of İshak Paşa Palace completed-PHOTO

World Bulletin / News Desk

The restoration of the famed İshak Paşa Palace in Eastern Turkey has been completed and the palace is now waiting for visitors.

The İshak Paşa Palace is situated high on a hill five kilometers from Doğubayazıt, a town in the province of Ağrı. The restoration and landscape project that was launched for the semi-ruined palace in November 2010 has been finished. The destroyed walls of the palace were reconstructed, the stone dressings were all repaired and watersheds were built around the palace to protect it from rain and snow.

Speaking with Today's Zaman, Van Relief and Monuments Provincial Director Cemil Karabayram said TL 10 million was spent on the restoration project. He indicated that the most necessary work done for the project was drying 180 years of moisture collected in the palace. “In order to be able to accomplish this, we removed the roof made of copper,” he said, “and we set up a special glass system which takes the heat in and exudes moisture.”

Construction of the palace started in 1685 by Çolak Abdi Paşa, the ruler of Doğubayazıt at the time, and was completed by his grandson İshak Paşa in 1784.

The palace, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, took 99 years to complete. It is known for having the first central heating system in history. It attracts many domestic and international travelers and carries major importance in reviving tourism in the region. The structure consists of 116 rooms, a mosque, court halls, a harem quarter and a shrine.

There are many things to enjoy inside the palace, although the two most striking rooms are the glorious mosque, with a built-in minbar (pulpit), off the second courtyard and the splendid pillared dining room beyond the third one. Look out, too, for an octagonal hamam (Turkish bath), bedrooms with sizeable fireplaces (for protection against the harsh winters of Eastern Turkey) and some unexpected wooden corbels -- that must once have supported a balcony -- which are curiously reminiscent of the gargoyle drains on the cathedrals of Western Europe.

Last Mod: 12 Mayıs 2013, 15:16
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