The students of famous calligrapher open exhibition

Born in 1891 in Diyarbakir, Turkey's southeastern province predominantly populated by Kurds, Hamid Aytac provided calligraphy trainings to several students throughout his life.

The students of famous calligrapher open exhibition

Global News Agency / News Center

The exhibition called "The Journey of Line" has brought calligraphers from traditional and classical schools, marbling drawers and miniature painters together. One of the characteristics that distinguishes the exhibition from its equivalents is the students of Hamid Aytac, worldly-known Turkish calligrapher who passed away in 1982, also contributed the exhibition. Aytac is accepted as one of the pioneers of calligraphy and is viewed as the one who helped the traditional art to be brought contemporary times. Additionally, the exhibition also hosts the portrait that contains the world's longest Elif line - the first letter of Arabic alphabet.

Born in 1891 in Diyarbakir, Turkey's southeastern province predominantly populated by Kurds, Hamid Aytac provided calligraphy trainings to several students throughout his life. The exhibition opened in Istanbul, hence is a unique chance to see Aytac's methods of calligraphy via his students. 

The piece in the event that attracts fairly more attention is the one drawn by Fuat Basar, one of Aytac's students and includes the longest Elif line. Calligraphies garnished by gilding, oil-paintings, miniatures are the other kind of pieces in the exhibition.  

Explaining Aytac's contribution to the calligraphy, his student Basar said "If you asked me to define him, I would say he was the bridge that has carried Ottoman alphabet to 20th century. He was the one who ran away from Diyarbakir with a train in the age of 9 for the love of calligraphy. He was able to survive in Istanbul and with his workings calligraphy reached its peak. He suffered so much. After the constitutional amendment that banned Ottoman alphabet in Republican era, he was unable to find a job. He was telling us that he had to sleep outside for three days due to lack of money. Despite these hardships, the love of calligraphy makes him a historical figure in calligraphy. For my opinion, he is one of the 15-20 masters of calligraphy history."

After the abolishment of Ottoman alphabet what Aytac gained his life, he had to work in publishing sector and gave private courses at home. Basar who also experienced those days with Aytac said "His works spread throughout the world. Since he was one of the few masters left from Ottoman times, people interested in calligraphy know him very well. I can say his reputation was larger in the outside of Turkey that in his homeland. He had never been wealthy and was always under tough conditions."

Last Mod: 21 Mayıs 2014, 17:31
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