In Pictures: Stateless People

Up to 15 million people are stateless, not recognised as nationals by any country.

In Pictures: Stateless People

Up to 15 million people are stateless, not recognised as nationals by any country. They are some of the most invisible people on the planet -- an anonymity the United Nations hopes to lift when it launches an international campaign to highlight their plight.

 

Zena Bashir does abolution as preparation ahead of the Friday prayers in Makina in Kibera slums in capital Nairobi in this August 5, 2011 file picture. The Nubians have lived in Kenya for over 100 years but they are regularly denied national identity cards and passports which they need to work, vote, travel, own a mobile phone, open a bank account, attend university or enter government buildings.

 

A teenage girl fixes her hair at an illegal Roma camp near Nantes, western France, in this July 30, 2010 file picture. An estimated 70,000 to 80,000 Roma have no nationality, they often do not register the birth of a child and do not hold official property titles, preferring to pass their houses to relatives informally. This makes it difficult to prove where they are from and leaves them very vulnerable.

 

Roma children sit alongside a cat, in their home in Alsozsolca, 200 km (124 miles) northeast of Budapest in this September 29, 2010 file picture.

 

Marus, 7, warms his hands next to a portable stove before going to school in Las Tablas, northern Madrid, in this March 21, 2011 file picture. An estimated 70,000 to 80,000 Roma have no nationality, they often do not register the birth of a child and do not hold official property titles, preferring to pass their houses to relatives informally.

 

Young Myanmar refugees from the Rohingya ethnic minority attend their English class in Kuala Lumpur in this August 16, 2011 file picture. In 1982 Myanmar passed a law which made it impossible for Rohingyas to get full citizenship. Many fled to Bangladesh in 1991 and 1992 following a government crackdown. Today, an estimated 800,000 live in Myanmar and up to 300,000 in Bangladesh.

 

Myanmar refugee from the Rohingya ethnic minority, Suhail Ramzah Ali, listens to his student during the Koran Memorization class in Kuala Lumpur in this August 16, 2011 file picture.

 

Stateless Nina Tamang, 18, is seen as she covers herself from an umbrella while she gaze her cattle's near her home at the outskirts of Nepal's capital August 14, 2011. Despite her mother being a Nepali national, Nina cannot become a citizen of Nepal because her father who had abandoned her mother after Nina was born is absent and she has no official proof of his nationality.

 

Young Myanmar refugee from the Rohingya ethnic minority, Musharafah Ali Johar, attends her English class in Kuala Lumpur in this August 16, 2011 file picture.

 

Nubian girls sell snack outside a Mosque for breaking the fast in Nairobis's Kibera slums in this August 5, 2011 file picture. The Nubians have lived in Kenya for over 100 years but they are regularly denied national identity cards and passports which they need to work, vote, travel, own a mobile phone, open a bank account, attend university or enter government buildings.

 

A Rohingya child plays in a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar in this file picture taken August 19, 2011. In 1982 Myanmar passed a law which made it impossible for Rohingyas to get full citizenship. Many fled to Bangladesh in 1991 and 1992 following a government crackdown. Today, an estimated 800,000 live in Myanmar and up to 300,000 in Bangladesh.

 

A Rohingya girl carries water in a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar in this August 19, 2011 file picture.

 

PHOTOS: REUTERS

 

 

 

Last Mod: 26 Ağustos 2011, 14:27
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