Inmarsat confident on Malaysian MH370 crash 'hotspot'

The hunt for the lost jet is currently taking a short break while ships map the Indian Ocean floor.

Inmarsat confident on Malaysian MH370 crash 'hotspot'

World Bulletin / News Desk

The UK satellite company Inmarsat has told the BBC that the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet has yet to go to the area its scientists think is the plane's most likely crash site.

Inmarsat's communications with the aircraft are seen as the best clues to the whereabouts of Flight MH370.

The hunt for the lost jet is currently taking a short break while ships map the Indian Ocean floor.

Along with a number of areas being fed into the investigation by other groups, the Inmarsat "hotspot" will be a key focus when the search continues.

The BBC's Horizon TV programme has been given significant access to the telecommunications experts at Inmarsat.

An Australian naval vessel was sent to investigate the region west of Perth, and followed up leads as they emerged.

According to the Horizon reports, the Ocean Shield ship never got to the Inmarsat hotspot because it picked up sonar detections some distance away that it thought were coming from the jet's submerged flight recorders.

The priority was to investigate these "pings", and two months were spent searching 850 sq km of sea bed. Ultimately, it turned out to be a dead end.

By modelling a flight with a constant speed and a constant heading consistent with the plane being flown by autopilot - the team found one flight path that lined up with all its data.

"We can identify a path that matches exactly with all those frequency measurements and with the timing measurements and lands on the final arc at a particular location, which then gives us a sort of a hotspot area on the final arc where we believe the most likely area is," said Mr Ashton.

MH370 was lost on 8 March en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. A total of 239 passengers and crew were on board.

Last Mod: 18 Haziran 2014, 10:43
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