Three Kashmiri boys killed after India hanging protests

Government forces are enforcing a rigid curfew for the third straight day in Indian-controlled Kashmir after India executed a Kashmiri man convicted in a deadly 2001 attack on Parliament.

Three Kashmiri boys killed after India hanging protests

World Bulletin / News Desk

Government forces are enforcing a rigid curfew for the third straight day in Indian-controlled Kashmir after India executed a Kashmiri man convicted in a deadly 2001 attack on Parliament.

Mohammed Afzal Guru was hanged in New Delhi on Saturday. Ahead of the execution, authorities ordered people in most of the Indian-held part of disputed Kashmir to remain indoors indefinitely in anticipation of anti-India protests.

Despite the curfew, hundreds of angry residents have protested in the region.

In Watergam village near the town of Sopore, which was Guru's home, at least four people were wounded, one critically, as police and paramilitary troops fired tear gas shells and bullets to disperse an angry crowd, police said.

One of the injured, 12-year-old Obaid Mushtaq, died early Monday, said Aijaz Mustafa, a medical superintendent at the S.K. Institute of Medical Sciences, a government hospital in Srinagar, the main city in Kashmir. He said another 18-year-old boy was on life support.

Another young man died in Sumbal village in northern Kashmir on Sunday after he jumped into a frigid river while trying to run away from troops who were firing tear gas and using batons to disperse the protesters. Four policemen were injured in separate clashes.

On Monday, local villagers fished out another body of a high school boy who was missing since Sunday's protest in Sumbal from the river, police said.

Tens of thousands of security troops were fanned out across the Himalayan region, and metal barricades and razor wire blocked all major roads in the area.

Cable television and mobile Internet services were shut in most parts of the region and Kashmir's nearly 60 newspapers were unable to publish.

Guru's execution is an extremely sensitive matter in the Himalayan region, where most people believe his trial was not fair. Several rights groups across India, and political groups in Muslim-majority Kashmir, also questioned the fairness of his trial.

Since 1989, Indian crackdown on the independence demands has killed an estimated 68,000 people, mostly civilians.

India-held Kashmir's top elected official expressed anger that authorities denied Guru's family a last meeting.

"I wish we were the ones authorized to give the news to the family — we owed him that much," Omar Abdullah, Indian Kashmir's top elected official, told CNN-IBN news channel on Sunday.

After the execution, Guru was buried in the prison compound.

Last Mod: 11 Şubat 2013, 16:53
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