Azerbaijan's 22 years of mourning the Khojaly massacre

On February 25-26 1992, reportedly with help of the Russian 366th Motor Rifle Regiment, Armenians entered the town, killing 613 Azeris, including 106 women and 83 children. 487 were seriously injured during the massacre, while another 275 were taken prisoner, of whom 150 were never heard of again. On top of that, many women were raped.

Azerbaijan's 22 years of mourning the Khojaly massacre

World Bulletin / News Desk

Azerbaijan has been commemorating the infamous Khojaly massacre this week, marking the 22nd anniversary since Armenian troops slaughter 613 Azeri civilians during the Nagorno-Karabkh war, which began upon the fall of the Soviet Union in 1988 and continued until 1994.

After Armenian forces captured the town of Hankendi, they turned their sights to Khojaly, which hosted the only airport in the region. By the end of 1991, the area of Khojaly was placed under an Armenian blockade, cutting off its 11,356 Azeri residents off from the world. Prior to the massacre, the town endured months of shelling by the Armenians.

As the roads out of Khojaly were blocked, the residents attempted to leave via helicopter. However, on January 28, Armenians shot down a helicopter carrying civilians, killing 44 people including women and children.

A month later, on February 25-26 1992, reportedly with help of the Russian 366th Motor Rifle Regiment, Armenians entered the town, killing 613 Azeris, including 106 women and 83 children. 487 were seriously injured during the massacre, while another 275 were taken prisoner, of whom 150 were never heard of again. On top of that, many women were raped.

Footage that emerged from the town afterwards showed bodies that had been severely mutilated, suggesting that some had been tortured to death. There were images of heads that had their skins removed, fingers that had their nails torn out, women who had half of their faces missing and even children who had their ears cut off.

Nonetheless, the international community chose to remain silent about the massacre. Even though the UN accepted that Armenia had invaded Azerbaijan in a resolution in 1993, there was no condemnation of the massacre, despite Azerbaijan's campaign to have it recognized as a genocide.

On the contrary, Armenian writers like Zori Balayan, who participated in the killing, were freely able to release books of the massacre, praising the Armenians for their actions.

However, the senates of Mexico and Pakistan, the parliaments of Colombia and Czech Republic, and the US states of New Jersey, Massachusetts, Georgia and Texas accepted the tragedy as a genocide.

 

 

Last Mod: 26 Şubat 2014, 15:01
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