'Death of a baby became so natural in Africa'

Havva Sula, a doctor for 30 years and member of Worldwide Doctors, told the problems of African women to based on her observations and visits in Africa.

'Death of a baby became so natural in Africa'

World Bulletin / News Desk

Turkish non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are working hard to reach to the people in need in Africa where the mortality rates for mothers and babies are among the world's highest. Worldwide Doctors are among the NGOs that work in Africa to ease the burden of the people living in hardship.

Havva Sula, a doctor for 30 years and member of Worldwide Doctors, told the problems of African women to AA based on her observations and visits in Africa.

Sula stated that an incident in Somali affected her deeply: "I came across a woman while I was walking around the hospital. She was standing still at the corridor, without an expression. We understood that there was a baby in the white creased cloth laying on the table. Her two month old baby was dead and her husband was packing her belongings. She wasn't crying or saying anything. We know how normally mothers who lost their children are. I had the urge to say something. I placed my hand on her shoulder and then she cried. Death of a baby is so natural and ordinary in Africa, the mothers consider it the same way. This was one of the moments I was touched by as a woman myself."

Sula emphasized that it was very difficult to have access to health care in Africa and stated that AIDS was common in many African countries. Although malaria was more widespread, Sula stated that NGOs didn't pay much attention to malaria and focused mainly on AIDS.

Sula also told about her reflections from the Democratic Republic of Congo and said, "A friend of mine had brought a hand-held doppler with her to Africa. She was making pregnant women listen to the heart beat of their children. We were in the second biggest city in Congo and some women were screaming, some crying, some couldn't believe their ears while listening to the heart beat of their children. This sounds awkward to us as we know everything about the baby from its gender to height when a woman is pregnant. But they have no idea about their baby. They are living 30-40 years in the past."

Sula also stated that women gave birth in extremely difficult conditions, the mortality rate for mothers and children were high and the UN aimed at reducing this number.

Stating that African women were still happy despite of all the difficulties, she emphasized that everyone should support them as much as they could.

Last Mod: 07 Mart 2013, 17:16
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