Raided Gaza ships in Turkey, UN to inspect for Israel probe

Turkey says the vessels would be inspected first by Turkish officials and then by a delegation from UN which has launched an international inquiry into the Israeli raid.

Raided Gaza ships in Turkey, UN to inspect for Israel probe

World Bulletin / News Desk

The Turkish Gaza aid ferry that was seized by Israel in a deadly raid in May reached Turkey's southern port of Iskenderun on Saturday.

Footage broadcast on news channels showed The Mavi Marmara being towed into the port of Iskenderun on Turkey's Mediterranean coast.


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Authorities imposed strict security measures for the ship's arrival, barring reporters from entering the port, the Anatolia news agency said.

Another Turkish vessel seized in the Israeli raid arrived at Iskenderun late Friday while a third was expected later Saturday, Anatolia said.


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All three ships were towed out of Israel on Thursday.

"Inspections"

UN's Ban Ki-moon announced the launch of international committee to probe deadly raid.

He said the panel would start working on August 10 and submit its first progress report in September.


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The head of the Iskenderun port, Cumhur Ozturkler, told Anatolia that the vessels would be inspected first by Turkish officials and then by a delegation from the United Nations which has launched an international inquiry into the Israeli raid.

The vessels were part of a six-ship flotilla which tried to break Israel's siege of the Gaza Strip and deliver tons of humanitarian aid.

On May 31, Israeli commandos stormed all six ships, brutally killed nine Turkish activists aboard the Mavi Marmara.


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The attack strained relations between Turkey and Israel to the point of breaking. Turkey, which withdrew its ambassador and suspended joint military exercises with Israel in protest of the attack, officially demanded an apology from Israel and an international investigation into the attack in international waters.

The United Nations Human Rights Council named its own three-person flotilla commission last month. That panel is also expected to report its findings in September.

The Israeli army's internal inquiry into the raid recommended no disciplinary action against senior officers, and concluded that "the use of live fire was justified" on board the Mavi Marmara.

A separate civilian panel, chaired by former Israeli supreme court judge Jacob Turkel, is also investigating the raid.


 

Last Mod: 07 Ağustos 2010, 12:49
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