Precautions for nuclear power plants in Turkey taken

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday that Turkey has taken and will take all necessary precautions regarding the new nuclear power plants in the Sinop and Mersin provinces of Turkey.

Precautions for nuclear power plants in Turkey taken

World Bulletin/News Desk

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Thursday that Turkey has taken and will take all necessary precautions regarding the new nuclear power plants in the Sinop and Mersin provinces of Turkey.

Speaking in the International Smart Networks Congress, Erdogan reminded the newly signed nuclear power plant agreement with Japan, which is going to be built in Sinop and said that it's the second after the one, signed with Russia for the nuclear power plant in Mersin. He emphasized that Turkey has taken and will take all necessary precautions regarding the new nuclear power plants in Sinop and Mersin and said, "For sure we will practise the latest modern systems to not treat people and environment unjustly and I hope that we will reach a clear energy resource. I wish this new process to be beneficial for Turkey".

Erdogan, saying that Turkey produced two times more electricity than ten years ago and that a third one is going to be built, reminded the third airport, which is going to be built in Istanbul with a 100 million passenger capacity.

He said, "When we consider its costs and the income of it in next 25 years, it is an enactment of 35-40 billion euros. The capital is exactly Turkish. With God's help, Turkey can build its own nuclear energy, too".

Saying that 72% of Turkey's energy is imported, Erdogan stated, "There won't be need for import of 1/3 of the natural gas that we are importing now with the stepping in of our nuclear power plants. We are going to prevent the import of natural gas worth $7.2 billion. We replace nuclear not with sun, water or wind, but for this import. We will take each precaution in security and will practise the most modern and most developed technology in nuclear power plants' security. When we consider the necessity of the increasing energy of Turkey and the sources that we pay abroad, we virtually practise a silent revolution with the new nuclear power plants.”

Turkey is set to overtake Britain as Europe's third-biggest electricity consumer within a decade and is seeking to cut its reliance on imported energy, the root cause of a gaping current account deficit that is its main economic weakness.

The agreement with Japan envisages the setting up of Turkish vocational colleges and universities to provide nuclear training. Under the deal with Rosatom, each year 100 students will be trained in Russia. The program attracted more than 5,000 applications for positions this year.

On Wednesday, Energy Minister Taner Yıldız said Ankara was looking for its third plant to be 80-85 percent built with Turkish engineering and expertise, although a foreign partner would probably still be involved in the financing.

"We will wait for the third plant in order to accumulate our nuclear experience. We would team up with a foreign partner, but the third one will not be a build-and-operate deal," he said, making it clear that Turkey would want to operate the plant itself.

Turkey is adopting the same model that Gulf states with atomic ambitions such as the United Arab Emirates have used -- relying on foreign talent and financing to build, operate and maintain their first plants as they seek to develop local expertise. While the UAE has a more comprehensive approach to developing home-grown expertise, Turkey has the advantage of a deeper level of experience in nuclear science, experts say. 

Last Mod: 10 Mayıs 2013, 10:52
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