Goal line technology approved by rule makers

Goal-line technology will be used in incidents where it is impossible for match officials to determine with the naked eye whether the ball has crossed the goal line.

Goal line technology approved by rule makers

World Bulletin / News Desk

Goal-line technology to confirm whether or not a goal has been scored and the employment of an extra linesman behind each goal was approved by world soccer's rule makers on Thursday

The International Football Association Board (IFAB) approved the use of two different technology systems which FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke said would be used at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

"We have decided to use the system at the Club World Cup in Tokyo (in December), at the Confederations Cup (in 2013) and the 2014 World Cup," Valcke told reporters.

Five-man refereeing teams, featuring an extra linesman behind each goal-line in addition to the two on the touchlines, have been used on an experimental basis recently in several competitions including the Champions League and Euro 2012.

Pioneered by UEFA, the system was credited at Euro 2012 with reducing the amount of pushing in the penalty area as well as cutting down on players attempting to win penalties by diving.

"This is a long-lasting decision and will resonate around the world," said Patrick Nelson, an IFAB member from Northern Ireland.

"We look forward to its implementation over the years."

Goal-line technology will be used in incidents where it is impossible for match officials to determine with the naked eye whether the ball has crossed the goal line.

These would include cases where it bounces down off the underside of the crossbar and is cleared away by a defender.

Pressure has been growing on soccer's governing body following a series of high-profile incidents over the years where teams have not been awarded goals even though the ball has clearly crossed the line.

The most prominent was at the 2010 World Cup when Frank Lampard's infamous phantom goal for England against Germany in the 2010 World Cup finals was disallowed when it was clearly over the line. Germany, leading 2-1 at the time, went on to win 4-1.

The systems approved are Hawk-Eye, which is used in tennis and cricket and is based on optical recognition with cameras, and GoalRef, which uses a magnetic field with a special ball to identify a goal.

Last Mod: 06 Temmuz 2012, 09:39
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