Iceland wants to ban internet porn

Iceland would become the first Western democracy to try and block pornography online.

Iceland wants to ban internet porn

World Bulletin / News Desk

Calling upon explicit online images being a threat to children, Iceland is working on banning Internet pornography.

'"There is a strong consensus building in Iceland," Halla Gunnarsdottir, an adviser to the nation's Interior Minister, told England's Daily Mail. "We have so many experts, from educationalists to the police and those who work with children behind this, that this has become much broader than party politics.

"At the moment, we are looking at the best technical ways to achieve this. But surely if we can send a man to the moon, we must be able to tackle porn on the Internet."

Two years ago, the nation's parliament banned strip clubs, saying they violate the rights of the women who work in them. They also banned the printing and distribution of pornography for years, but those laws haven't been updated to include the Web.

Iceland would become the first Western democracy to try and block pornography online.

To keep young people from seeing explicit images and videos on computers, game consoles and smartphones, Interior Minister Ogmundur Jonasson has appointed committees to come up with the best solutions.

The options being considered, according to the Daily Mail, include blocking the IP addresses of known porn sites and making it illegal to use credit cards from Iceland to subscribe to X-rated sites.

"This move is not anti-sex. It is anti-violence because young children are seeing porn and acting it out," Gunnarsdottir said. "That is where we draw the line. This material is blurring the boundaries for young people about what is right and wrong."

The move is, predictably, drawing fire from Web-freedom advocates, including some in Iceland who agree with Jonasson on most issues.

"Since he claimed office as minister, Jonasson has brought forward progressive legislation and has shown that he can be a man of principles and courage. For that, I truly respect him," Birgitta Jonsdottir, a member of Iceland's parliament who represents part of Reykjavik, wrote in an editorial for London's The Guardian.

"But he is way off track in his attempts to place a shield around Iceland in order to 'stop porn' from entering the country."

A member of the parliament committee, Jonsdottir says a porn ban has "near zero" chance of passing parliament and that she's working to find other ways the government can help protect children from Web porn.

"Introducing censorship without compromising freedom of expression and speech is like trying to mix oil and water: It is impossible," she wrote. "I know my fellow MPs can often turn strange and dangerous laws into reality, but this won't be one of them."

Last Mod: 24 Haziran 2014, 16:30
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DCM
DCM - 5 yıl Before

Send a man to the moon? Don't they mean "send a longship to Newfoundland"?

Boko Obama
Boko Obama - 5 yıl Before

Just unplug from the world.

Eric Hamell
Eric Hamell - 5 yıl Before

As several research organizations noted in a friend-of-the-court brief to the US Supreme Court, there is no science behind the claim that children are harmed by exposure to sexually oriented material (go to fepproject.org/archives/courtbriefs.html and click on "Supreme Court Brief in the 'COPA' Case.") In the US, the Internet still plays a significant role in helping people with variant and still-stigmatized erotic interests find one another. This law would likely suppress such communications.