Troubled Muslim world preparing to enter holy month of Ramadan

Many countries such as Myanmar, Central African Republic, China, India, and Angola are being restricted from living their religion in peace with the pressure and torture that their government is making them go through.

Troubled Muslim world preparing to enter holy month of Ramadan

World Bulletin / News Desk

While many of the world's 1.6 billion Muslims are preparing to celebrate Ramadan, the month of fasting, there are some who will not be free to acknowledge the most sacred month of the Islamic calendar.

Many countries such as Myanmar, Central African Republic, China, India, and Angola are being restricted from living their religion in peace with the pressure and torture that their government is making them go through.

During Ramadan Muslims around the world go through a routine of fasting for 30 days, but not all Muslims have the freedom to do so. Many Muslims have fled from their homes and have been killed by majorities that oppose them.

The Rohingya are a group of Muslims that live in the the predominantly Buddhist of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. They are isolated by the Buddhist extremists and are seen as Bengalis. Medical care and education is not provided for them, more than 140,000 have been displaced, and over 230 people have been killed due to religious violence.

Increasing Buddhist extremism is also targeting Muslim minorities in Sri Lanka and Thailand.

Meanwhile, over 2,000 Muslims in Central African Repubic have been killed by the Christian Anti-Balaka militias and thousands have left their homes which were in Christian-majority areas because of the continuous sectarian violence. "We didn't want the Muslims here and we don't want their mosque here anymore either,'' Christian looter Guy Richard told news agency AP after more than 1,200 Muslims had fled the capital Bangui.

Uighurs are also subjected to religious discrimination by the Chinese government. They were left starving during the Great Leap Forward Campaign (1958-1962), which led hundreds of thousands of them moving away from their native East Turkestan (renamed Xinjiang bu the Chinese) to the Soviet Union.

One of the world's largest Islamic community is found in India, which has a Hindu majority. Between 50,000-200,000 Muslims are believed to have been killed in pogroms in Hyderabad in 1948, during the Partition crisis. With the election of Hindu nationalist Narendre Modi as Prime Minister recently, Indian Muslims are already seeing a rise in attacks against them.

In Angola Islam was declared illegal and all mosques were forcefully shut down. Islam was called a 'sect' by the Minister of culture Rosa Cruz e Silva. Muslims, many of whom migrated from west Africa and Lebanon, often face hostility from lawmakers.

The stalling of the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks have also opened the way for Israeli raids on Gaza and the West Bank, as well as constant breaches on the Al-Aqsa Mosque in East Jerusalem, Islam's third holiest site.

Up to six million Syrians have been turned into refugees as the civil war in their country between Bashar al-Assad's regime and opposition groups enters its fourth year, so far claiming up over 150,000 lives. The crisis in Iraq, which threatened to spill over into a war between Sunni and Shiite Muslims in the region, has also forced many Iraqis to flee their homes.

Libya has also been a hotspot for violence, as the post-Gaddafi government struggles to contain militias. A similar situation persists in Yemen.

However, Ramadan, an Islamic month in which Muslims fast from dawn until dusk everyday for 29 or 30 days, is supposed to be a time when Muslims make peace and renew their ties to their religion. Though fighting has continued in previous years, many hope this year's Ramadan will bring the Muslim world some much needed peace.

Last Mod: 27 Haziran 2014, 12:31
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