23 cholera deaths, 670 infections in S. Sudan

UNICEF said 100 children had been diagnosed with cholera since the outbreak first occurred in Juba.

23 cholera deaths, 670 infections in S. Sudan

World Bulletin / News Desk

The World Health Organization (WHO) said Tuesday that at least 23 people had died of cholera in South Sudan while another 670 had been infected.

"As of yesterday, over 670 cases had been registered, both in Juba Teaching Hospital and Gurei [in Juba]; 23 have died, 14 inside the hospital and nine outside," Dr. Abdinasir Abubakar, medical officer for communicable diseases at the WHO's Juba office, told a press conference.

Of the registered cases, he said, over 80 percent had received treatment at Juba Hospital's cholera treatment center.

Dr. Abubakar warned that cholera appeared to be on the rise.

"Cholera is spreading rapidly in Juba and our fear is that it might spread to other parts of the country," he said.

"One common issue is that all the cases were drinking untreated water from the river," the WHO official added.

Dr. Abubakar also said that, given the rapid spread in the capital, vaccination was not a priority.

"The priority is having good sanitation and hygiene," he stressed.

Dr. Abdulkadir Musse, UNICEF's senior emergency response officer, underlined the need for collective efforts.

"Addressing the cholera outbreak in South Sudan requires a concerted effort from everybody – community members in particular – through simple but vital steps to stop cholera," he told the same press conference.

"Proficient and correct use of clean water is vital in fighting cholera," said the UNICEF official. "Provision of clean water in the country is very limited and is one reason why cholera is increasing."

Dr. Musse said 100 children had been diagnosed with cholera since the outbreak first occurred in Juba.

"So far, 100 children have been registered [with cholera]: 57 girls and 43 boys," he noted. "Children are the most affected in crises."

"Two deaths were reported at the community level and one in hospital," said the UNICEF official.

He added that UNICEF had spent $1.7 million within the last two weeks and needed a further $10 million to continue its anti-cholera campaign in South Sudan.

Last Mod: 28 Mayıs 2014, 11:49
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