Drones challenge US-Pakistan rapproachment

Since 2004 drone attacks in Pakistan have killed about 3,000 people, at least 400 of whom were civilians and nearly 200 were children, according the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in the UK.

Drones challenge US-Pakistan rapproachment

World Bulletin/News Desk

Drones, US  counterterrorizm tools, are criticized by international organizations for causing loss of lives.

A report presented by Amnesty International asks US to stop drone attacks in Pakistan asks justification for the 900 innocents' killing by these attacks in the 9 year tenure declaring these attacks unlawful.

Drones used as weapons by the US after  9/11 attacks in Iraq, Libya, Somali Gaza, Yemen, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

However s-called "US's most effective counterterrorism tool" caused hundreds of loss of lives and  affected US-Pakistan relations adversely.

Visiting Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif called for an end to US drone strikes inside his country, saying they are a "major irritant" in bilateral ties.

Law professor at American University, Kenneth Anderson says the issue is not whether or not "force" will be used that will always risk some level of civilian casualties.

"The assumption of drone critics is that if only the US would stop using drones, there would be no need of armed response.  But that's simply not the case: the realistic alternatives are not between drones and no force used, but instead drones or something that else that is vastly more destructive to the life and property of the FATA villages," Anderson says.

The US might decide to follow the public words of the Pakistani government - the PM and not the military - and stop the drone strikes, he says and adds "The result might be negative for the interests of the US, but over time, the effect is to create safe havens that will only be uprooted by artillery and air attack by the Pakistani military, and that will be vastly more harmful to villagers than the drone strikes."

"Drones are used exceedingly carefully and we lament the loss of innocent life whenever it happens but  it happens fairly rarely these days," says Senior fellow with the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and director of research for the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution.

He expresses hope that Pakistan will make efforts to control its own territory and says "we are willing to help in that effort with security assistance of various types."

Prof. Marvin G. Weinbaum,from University of Illinois, who served  as an analyst for Pakistan and Afghanistan in the US Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research is quite sure that Pakistani PM Sharif will undoubtedly be told that the US will be increasingly cautious in the use of drones.

"I presume that Sharif will continue its press for a halt to drone attacks while here in Washington and his views will be politely received—but that's all. Both sides are reasonably pleased with the way that relations have recovered since 2011 and neither wants to upset a degree of normalization based on narrowed but still significant overlapping strategic interests," says Weinbaum.

Since 2004 drone attacks in Pakistan have killed about 3,000 people, at least 400 of whom were civilians and  nearly 200 were children, according the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in the UK.

Last Mod: 23 Ekim 2013, 17:18
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