Iraqi Sunni tribes preparing to 'finish off' the ISIL

Having seen the massacres not only carried out on local Christian and Yazidi minorities, but also on their fellow Sunnis, Sunni tribes that once supported the ISIL are now planning to expel the ISIL from their midst, an Iraqi Kurdish tribal leader said.

Iraqi Sunni tribes preparing to 'finish off' the ISIL

World Bulletin / News Desk

As self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) militant continue to threaten Iraqi Kurds in the autonomous Kurdish Regional Government of northern Iraq, local tribes are preparing to fight to defend their homeland.

Speaking to Al Jazeera Turk, Fazil Berwari, the leader of the Berwari tribe - one of the strongests tribes in northern Iraq - said that they have been meeting with fellow Sunni tribes who have now understood the danger the ISIL poses and are preparing to bring an end to them.

The ISIL, which took Iraq by shock when they captured Mosul, Iraq's second biggest city on June 10 with little resistance, was originally supported by local Arab Sunni tribes who had grown tired to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Shi'ite dominated government.

However, having seen the massacres not only carried out on local Christian and Yazidi minorities, but also on their fellow Sunnis, the tribes are now planning to expel the ISIL from their midst, Berwari said.

"When the ISIL entered Mosul, the people and some tribes supported them. However, these tribes later realised they had fallen into a trap and became regretful of their support, because they saw the ISIL killing their own kind and even bombing their mosques," Berwari explained.

"This organization does not have a religion. It is unclear what their aims are. There should be no doubt that this organization is an enemy to all. They are enemies to all humanity. The Sunni tribes have understood how dangerous this organization is and will now finish them off," he added.

Amid fierce clashes with the Iraqi army and the Kurdish peshmerga forces, ISIL fighters have tightened their grip on northern Iraq, seizing towns with minority populations, as well as Iraq's largest dam near Mosul.

ISIL militants captured the Sinjar and Rabia districts in Nineveh province last week, forcing thousands of Turkmens, Arabs, Christians and Yazidis to flee.

Iraq's outgoing Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who has been in power since 2006 and is refusing to step down as he seeks a third term, has been held partially responsible for creating the current crisis.

On Monday, the deputy chairman of the Iraqi parliament Haider al-Abadi was nominated prime minister by the Shi'ite National Alliance, the largest group in parliament, which had formerly supported Maliki. That led to President Fuad Masum inviting Abadi to create a government.

Meanwhile, the militants are massing near the Iraqi town of Qara Tappa, 122 km (73 miles) north of Baghdad, security sources and a local official said, in an apparent bid to broaden their front with Kurdish peshmerga fighters.

The Sunni militants have made a dramatic push through the north to a position near Arbil, the capital of the semi-autonomous Kurdish region.

The movement around Qara Tappa suggests they are getting more confident and seeking to grab more territory closer to the capital after stalling in that region.

Last Mod: 14 Ağustos 2014, 12:50
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