US mosques urged to take precaution before rallies

Organizers of hate rallies indicated that participants in states with open carry laws may be armed and that provocations such as use of live pigs, Quran desecrations may occur, CAIR says

US mosques urged to take precaution before rallies

World Bulletin / News Desk

Fearing possible attacks against mosques, a leading US Muslim advocacy group has urged mosques cross America Monday to take additional safety measures prior to anti-Islam rallied panned on October 10.

"Media reports and monitoring of anti-Muslim hate sites indicate that a small group of anti-Muslim extremists with a history of violent rhetoric are attempting to organize hate rallies outside a number of mosques across the nation on October 10," the alert issued by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) stated.

"Organizers of the hate rallies have indicated that participants in states with open carry laws may be armed and that provocations such as the use of live pigs and Quran desecrations may occur."

CAIR cited a Facebook page titled "Global Rally for Humanity," as being the focal point for planning what is right now estimated to be 20 separate rallies nationwide. The group is calling on protesters to be armed where permitted.

The slogan for the group and their series of rallies is "The World is Saying No To Islam," and a flyer widely circulated by the group mentions the "3%ers and Oathkeepers."

"The anti-Islam rallies come at a time of increased hate-motivated crimes and bias incidents nationwide targeting persons and property associated, or perceived to be associated, with Islam and the American Muslim community," the alert read.

Though many of these planned rallied may not take place, CAIR asked Muslims to remain vigilante regardless and work with law enforcement to prevent any violence.

"Many of these planned rallies may not take place, or they may consist of only a handful of people shouting slurs at worshipers. But given the recent endorsement of Islamophobia by national public figures, it would only be prudent for mosque and community leaders to prepare for any eventuality."

US Muslims, estimated at between seven to eight million, have been sensing hostility since 9/11 attacks.

Anti-Muslim sentiments have reached an all-time high after the rise of the so-called Islamic State, formerly known as Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Facing growing attacks on Muslims, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has launched a new website, Islamophobia.org, to monitor and challenge the growing anti-Muslim bigotry.

In September 2014, CAIR published “Know Your Rights and Responsibilities” pocket guide that tells American Muslims to report any actual knowledge of criminal activity without being asked by law enforcement authorities.

CAIR's booklet, called "Best Practices for Mosque and Community Safety", was published in 2007 in response to previous attacks on American mosques,

The guidelines are designed to be used by mosque officials, Muslim school administrators and other community leaders and activists who seek to identify and eliminate vulnerabilities to bias-motivated attacks.

Last Mod: 05 Ekim 2015, 14:19
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