Aswan calm, Brotherhood denies inciting feuding

At least 26 people were killed and dozens others injured in three days of clan fighting in Aswan before government officials managed to strike a truce between the feuding clans

Aswan calm, Brotherhood denies inciting feuding

World Bulletin/News Desk

Calm prevailed Sunday in Egypt's southern city of Aswan, where three days of clan fighting last week left 26 people dead, as a truce consolidated by Al-Azhar Imam Ahmed al-Tayeb appeared to hold.

Al-Tayeb met separately on Saturday with chieftains from the Daboudia and Hilaliya clans who agreed to extend a truce reached last week to open door for reconciliation.

During a press conference, al-Tayeb said the two clans had agreed to the forming of a committee from Al-Azhar, the highest seat of religious learning in the Muslim Sunni world, to look into ways of mending fences and determining compensation for people affected from both sides.

Meanwhile, the Muslim Brotherhood of ousted president Mohamed Morsi distanced itself from a man accused by the prosecution of "inciting" the Aswan violence.

In a statement, the group said Negm al-Din Ibrhaim, a teacher, is not a member of the group.

"The security forces are trying to frame the Brotherhood after failing to preserve security and protect innocent lives," it added.

The prosecution had remanded Ibrahim in custody for four days on charges of incitement to murder and involvement in rioting and arson.

At least 26 people were killed and dozens others injured in three days of clan fighting in Aswan before government officials managed to strike a truce between the feuding clans.

Following the outbreak of the violence on April 4, military spokesman Ahmed Ali said there were "indications" of involvement by Muslim Brotherhood members.

Last December, Egypt designated the Brotherhood as a "terrorist" organization following an attack on a Nile Delta security headquarters in which 16 people, mostly police, were killed.

The Brotherhood had denied involvement in the attack and reiterated principled commitment to peaceful activism.

Tribal vendettas – often deadly – are common in Upper Egypt, where there is a greater proliferation of weapons than in Egypt's northern provinces. In many cases, feuds between local families can be traced back decades.

When such vendettas occur, the government is often involved in the mediation and reconciliation efforts that follow.

Last Mod: 13 Nisan 2014, 14:37
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