Brotherhood says Sisi's presidential ambitions behind ouster

Other reasons included the army's alleged desire to maintain the elevated social status of its officers, protect its wide-ranging economic interests, and maintain the secrecy of its annual budget.

Brotherhood says Sisi's presidential ambitions behind ouster

World Bulletin / News Desk

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood has accused Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi of ousting elected president Mohamed Morsi this summer with the aim of replacing him as the country's leader.

In a Wednesday statement, the Brotherhood cited seven "reasons" for the army's July 3 removal of Morsi, a Brotherhood leader.

The list was topped by al-Sisi's own presidential ambitions.

Other reasons included the army's alleged desire to maintain the elevated social status of its officers, protect its wide-ranging economic interests, and maintain the secrecy of its annual budget.

The Brotherhood also attributed this summer's "military coup" to fears that the Morsi administration would lead Egypt into dangerous "military adventures"; shared "ideologies and interests" between Egypt's military leadership and Western powers; and fears of spreading democracy on the part of several Gulf countries.

The military, for its part, has not responded to the Brotherhood statement.

Although al-Sisi has not declared any intention to run in Egypt's upcoming presidential elections, calls have grown among some quarters in recent weeks for the top general to vie for the country's top office.

Several web pages and online campaigns have recently appeared, particularly on social-networking site Facebook, calling for an al-Sisi presidential bid.

A petition campaign launched earlier this month calling on the general to run for the presidency claims to have gathered 5.5 million citizens' signatures.

In a recent interview, al-Sisi said it was premature to discuss whether he would run in upcoming presidential polls, the first since the military ousted Morsi almost four months ago.

Morsi, Egypt's first freely-elected leader, was removed from power by the powerful military establishment on July 3 after massive protests against his presidency.

The unconstitutional change of government is described by the ousted president's backers as a military coup, while supporters of the move call it a military-backed "popular uprising."

Last Mod: 30 Ekim 2013, 15:09
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