Islamist parties in Egypt warn after Sisi's call

Egyptian Islamist parties and forces described army chief and Defense Minister Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi's call for mass Friday protests to authorize him to "combat terrorism" as a dangerous step that could lead to "civil war."

Islamist parties in Egypt warn after Sisi's call

Egyptian Islamist parties and forces described army chief and Defense Minister Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi's call for mass Friday protests to authorize him to "combat terrorism" as a dangerous step that could lead to "civil war."

"Pitting crowds against crowds is no solution. This only divides people," Bassem al-Zarqa, deputy leader of the Salafist Nour Party, wrote on his Facebook page.

"Waving your fist does not stop violence but only creates a path for more bloodshed. The only peaceful way out is parliamentary elections," al-Zarqa said.

Earlier today, al-Sisi urged Egyptians to take to the streets for mass Friday protests to "authorize" him to "confront violence."

"I'm asking the Egyptian people to go out like they did on June 30 and July 3," he said in a televised address at a graduation ceremony for military cadets.

"I want you to show the world that you are authorizing me to confront any possible violence and terrorism," he added.

Ahmed Badie, spokesman for the Salafist Watan Party, criticized al-Sisi's call.

"This is a call for civil war," he told Anadolu Agency.

"This call has no official or legal basis. Where are the interim president, the vice president and the prime minister?" Badie asked.

"Al-Sisi is acting as if he calls the shots. We have never before seen someone asking the public for a mandate to kill people," he added.

Mohamed Abu-Samrah, secretary-general of the Islamic Party, the political arm of Egypt's Islamic Jihad group, said that al-Sisi's address had confirmed that what happened in Egypt was a military coup.

"Al-Sisi wants a mandate from his supporters to kill his opponents after he saw millions of people take to the streets to protest his military coup," Abu-Samrah told AA.

The powerful army overthrew Morsi, Egypt's first democratically elected president, on July 3 following mass protests against his regime.

It suspended the constitution and installed Adly Mansour, the head of Egypt's constitutional court, as interim president.

Morsi supporters have been out on the streets ever since, staging mass protests and sit-ins to defend his democratic legitimacy and demand his reinstatement.

They, too, are calling for mass protests on Friday as part of their ongoing show of solidarity with the deposed president.

AA

Last Mod: 24 Temmuz 2013, 16:53
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