Israel's Livni rules out unity govt with far-right

A recent poll ahead of the looming Knesset elections has shown that a center-left alliance between Labor and Hatnuah parties has outdone the ruling right-wing Likud party by one seat.

Israel's Livni rules out unity govt with far-right

World Bulletin/News Desk

Sacked Israeli justice minister and Hatnuah party leader Tzipi Livni ruled out Friday that the party would participate in a unity government with the right-wing Likud party following the upcoming Knesset elections, slated for March 17.

"The far-right bloc which includes the Likud and [Jewish Home] parties has an agenda that is clearly different from ours," Livni told Israel's army radio on Friday.

 Livni also hinted that she will seek the position of defense minister in the upcoming cabinet.

"I was a member in the security cabinet for 10 years and one of three (along with prime minister and defense minister) who make the decisions on war and military operations, including classified ones," she said. "And I would keep fighting the concept that women cannot handle security files, because they can," the former Mossad agent added.

A recent poll ahead of the looming Knesset elections has shown that a center-left alliance between Labor and Hatnuah parties has outdone the ruling right-wing Likud party by one seat.

The survey, conducted by the Knesset's television channel on Tuesday, revealed that the recently-unveiled Labor-Hatnuah alliance would garner 24 out of 120 seats in the upcoming Knesset elections, while the Likud would secure 23.

Right-wing Jewish Home party, led by Economy Minister Naftali Bennet,  came in third with 16 seats followed by the Kulanu party, led by former minister Moshe Kahlon,  which would win 10 seats.

Last month, Prime Minister and Likud leader Benjamin Netanyahu called early elections, citing difficulties in leading the state with his outgoing government.

Netanyahu had dismissed Livni and Finance Minister Yair Lapid earlier, prompting the collapse of his coalition government.

Israel held its last general election in January of 2013. General elections must be held every four years in case there is no decision to hold snap elections.

 

Last Mod: 16 Ocak 2015, 13:38
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