Morsi's deputy awaits mediation talks with army

Mahmoud Mekki has sent a message to the military-backed authorities that he would "not begin mediation efforts unless there is a real desire [for reconciliation] on the part of the authorities."

Morsi's deputy awaits mediation talks with army

World Bulletin / News Desk

Ousted president Mohamed Morsi's resigned vice-president, Mahmoud Mekki, is reportedly awaiting a call from army chief Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi to mediate a solution to Egypt's ongoing political crisis, sources in Morsi's main support bloc told Anadolu Agency on Wednesday.

Mekki has sent a message to the military-backed authorities that he would "not begin mediation efforts unless there is a real desire [for reconciliation] on the part of the authorities," according to sources in the pro-Morsi National Alliance for the Defense of Legitimacy.

"He [Mekki] would consider a call from al-Sisi as a goodwill gesture," one of the sources said.

Egypt has remained in a state of turmoil since the military deposed democratically-elected Morsi on July 3 following massive protests against his presidency.

Pro-Morsi demonstrators continue to stage daily rallies against what they call the "military coup" against the elected leader.

Sources told AA that Mekki planned to draw up a working team within the next few days to mediate between Egypt's military-backed government and the pro-Morsi coalition.

Mekki, who resigned his post six months before Morsi's ouster, is expected to meet with representatives of the two rival camps in coming days to test the waters.

"Based on what he hears from both sides, Mekki will decide the next step," one of the sources said.

A reformist judge who spoke out against election fraud in 2005 under former strongman Hosni Mubarak, Mekki served as Morsi's vice-president after the latter won presidential elections in June of last year.

Six months into the job, however, Mekki stepped down only days before a new constitution – which did not mention the post of vice president – was approved in a popular referendum.

In his resignation letter, Mekki said that working in politics was not appropriate for a judge.

He has since remained tight-lipped on political developments in Egypt, making him a good choice for a possible mediator.

Other public figures proposed for the role have included Morsi's prime minister, Hisham Qandil, and Islamist thinker Mohamed Selim al-Awa, who ran against Morsi in last year's presidential poll.


Last Mod: 30 Ekim 2013, 17:55
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